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Genetics ??

May 9, 2008
432
0
Hartford, CT
Ok...this has come up in several posts and articles that I have read this week...

How do you know if you have the physical ability to be a pitcher?
When do you know when to keep working and when to move on?

After watching College ball for the last few months.....pitchers come in all shapes & sizes .....
 

May 7, 2008
110
0
5,

This is obviously a subjective area. When people speak of genetics I think they are primarily talking about SIZE and ATHLETICISM. What we used to refer to as a natural. A superior athlete is easy to identify. They are faster, stronger, more coordinated. They have an inborn ability to use their bodies efficiently.

However, athleticism is only one aspect of sports performance. Do not forget SKILLS, HEART, DESIRE, COMPETITIVENESS, POISE, etc.

I focus on the things I can influence and forget about the things I can't...like genetics!

Keith
 
May 9, 2008
432
0
Hartford, CT
genetics

Just wondering .... my kids are young so we aren't worrying about that yet.


I think determination and effort can overcome some/most physical "inefficiencies".

If you really want something, it is amazing what any one person can overcome ....
 
May 7, 2008
110
0
Also, consider this...

...there are programs available now that can and do improve overall athleticism. I have firsthand experience with Velocity Sports Performance. This is an incredible facility that works to improve the so-called SPARQ abilities. My DD went through their program for 6 months a dramatically improved in all elements!

Keith
 
May 9, 2008
432
0
Hartford, CT
genetics

Thanks...we will have to check some of this out...love to work on some of this over the summer into fall.

Part genetics, part personality for my daughter....although the small speed barrier breakthrough this weekend has her very motivated.

Conversations overheard today indicate that coaches and teams have already been decided on (tryouts and team votes mean nothing in two weeks) and my daughter did not make the team.
The "guys" all chatted about where their kids would play....etc....

Guess we have a lot to do for next year!

I'll see what I can find in the Hartford area!
Thanks!
 
May 7, 2008
235
0
We have taught our children to pursue their passions. Pitching requires more time in practicing, evaluating, tweaking, etc. in addition to all the attributes of other positions. Size does not always determine success. I wish this wasn't true, but coaches ultimately decide, and there are some coaches who discriminate (I would hope few and far between). If your dd wants to pitch, support her. It will become evident, without having to say much, whether her dedication defines her ability.

Ang
 

Ken Krause

Administrator
Admin
May 7, 2008
3,421
38
Mundelein, IL
Also remember that your daughter can have a fine and fun pitching career without pitching in the D1 Women's College World Series. In that case, genetics become less important than desire, determination, stick-to-itiveness and other factors.
 

sluggers

Super Moderator
Staff member
May 26, 2008
5,751
48
Dallas, Texas
Sorry, but you guys are smoking some bad hooch. The stuff about "hard work" being important is simply hooey. Genetics is *THE* determinative factor in success in college.

Why? Because at the top level in every division, EVERY starting pitcher works hard in college, whether it is D1, D2 or D3. If everyone is working hard, then the successful pitchers have something else. They are smarter, faster, stronger or have better eye-hand coordination than the others.

Don't pretend that a kid can be successful in college because they work hard. It simply isn't true.

As to discrimination--coaches discriminate by putting the players on the field who win. In my 10+ years with daughters playing sports in college, the coach always gives everyone on the team a chance to prove that they can play. The difference is that some kids deliver in the game and some kids don't. If a kid doesn't take advantage of the opportunities she is given, she sits.

To tell kids anything else is simply feeding them sports mythology. It will confuse them when they get older, and they will feel cheated by sports.

JRW
 

FastpitchFan

Softball fan
Feb 28, 2008
496
0
Montreal, Canada
Wow isn't that a great debate! Nature (genetics) vs. Nurture (environment). Most sports coaches and people working the trenches strongly believe in the concept of talent. We have all seen it - you know naturally athletic kid for whom everything is easy.

That must explain why they become such great players. Well, most scientists will disagree with you.

I spent most my 5 years in graduate school studying talent development, sports expertise and athlete long-term development.

One thing I can tell you...

after seeing research after research after research and none of them supporting the "talent" (nature) theory but clearly showing that the "environment" (nurture) is responsible for most of the greatest accomplishments and performances, I had to realize that having talent is a small portion of the equation of high performance.

Let's point something right away: there is NO DOUBT that some people have a genetic predisposition to perform better in athletics.

However, that alone is far down the list of the greatest predictors of athletic success according to research.

I know I know - you can't believe it because you see "talented" athletes everywhere.

Let's look at a few of the greatest in sport...and let's remove talent from the equation for a second...

I will list only a "few" of the factors that can explain it..

Tiger Woods - started at age 3, had a model (dad), was super committed and trained hard for many years, received top notch instruction, mother used east-asian influences to develop a stronger mind and focus, etc..

Michael Jordan - was cut from HS!!! Absolute work ethic, super determined, never gave up, practiced hours and hours by himself, vizualized what he wanted to do, etc...

Wayne Gretzky - practiced on a pound at home for hours and hours, born in the right country (Do you think he would have been the greatest hockey player in history if he was born in Texas in the 1960's?? Not a chance.), always played up, got reat coaching, amazing parental support...

I could go on and on and on. The point is... YES, great athletes
have genetic pre-disposition BUT this is NOT a great predictor
of success.

Let me enumerate some of the predictors of success in sport...

1) 10-year or 10 000 hours of quality, structured training (games are NOT considered training)

2)Great coaching and instruction, mentors

3) Parental support (supportive but that don't put pressure)

4) Motivation - intrinsic motivation (motivation that comes from within because sport makes them feel competent, provides a sense of belonging, sense of achievement, reaching flow-like state...). Extrinsic motivation (playing to please, to get recognition or awards) doesn't work in the long run.

5) Enjoyment - having fun and experiencing flow (social aspect for girls is super important)

6) Innate abilities and physical pre-disposition - is only one of the predictors BUT not the greatest. It contributes to talent development but much less than we think.

7) Psychological skills and personality traits (ability to cope, confidence, ability to focus, work ethic, competitiveness, optimism, "flexible" perfectionism, emotional control, ability to relax, coachability, control of self-talk, etc.)

8) Culture and environnment - has to do with importance of sport in country or part of the country (you stand more than to be a great hockey player in Minnesota than in Florida and a better softball player in California than Iowa), value given to athletic achievement, access to training facilities, climate racial influences, etc.

9) School - they spend so much time there that if the environment is positive, it will allow for the development of self-confidence, ahtletic abilities, rights habits to succeed, etc.

10) Age - 1) The younger you start the better 2)kids born in the same year but that are older and closer to the cut-off age stands more chance to be selected because they are more likely to be physically mature (studies have proven this again and again)

11) Self-confidence in physical abilities

There are a few other minor ones.

These research findings comes from studying elite performers and are NOT some hypothesis or beliefs. Just scientific facts that you might agree with or not. That is just what science tells us.

But guess what... the debate will live on.. :)

Marc
 
May 7, 2008
235
0
Sorry, but you guys are smoking some bad hooch. The stuff about "hard work" being important is simply hooey. Genetics is *THE* determinative factor in success in college.

Why? Because at the top level in every division, EVERY starting pitcher works hard in college, whether it is D1, D2 or D3. If everyone is working hard, then the successful pitchers have something else. They are smarter, faster, stronger or have better eye-hand coordination than the others.

Don't pretend that a kid can be successful in college because they work hard. It simply isn't true.

As to discrimination--coaches discriminate by putting the players on the field who win. In my 10+ years with daughters playing sports in college, the coach always gives everyone on the team a chance to prove that they can play. The difference is that some kids deliver in the game and some kids don't. If a kid doesn't take advantage of the opportunities she is given, she sits.

To tell kids anything else is simply feeding them sports mythology. It will confuse them when they get older, and they will feel cheated by sports.

JRW

Sorry, JRW...I don't smoke hooch. You have mixed fact and opinion to leave the reader very confused. Watch sweeping statements with broad strokes. I am glad you and your dd had a wonderful experience in youth and college sports. I suggest researching your opinion. You may find out that environment (which influences skill, work ethic and confidence) and genetics are more closely linked than you think.

Ang
 

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