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Riseball Help

Feb 3, 2010
5,295
63
Pac NW
Try telling a hitter that a rise doesn’t jump! I know in my mind it doesn’t, but every time I step into a batters box, KNOWING it’s coming, I still swing under!
 
Apr 12, 2015
536
43
Catching rise balls isn't much fun either. If you are a bucket coach or dad/mom and haven't gotten a mask yet, you will when you start catching those things.
 
Oct 4, 2018
1,195
113
Try telling a hitter that a rise doesn’t jump! I know in my mind it doesn’t, but every time I step into a batters box, KNOWING it’s coming, I still swing under!
I can imagine the girls, after getting used to the arc of a fastball for 5+ years. They see the ball coming and are stunned they swung under it.
 
May 30, 2013
1,310
63
Binghamton, NY
The result is something like this:
This is a good example of a "low rise".
Seems oxymoron-ish, but if you consider a "rise" to be about spin axis, and not about location, then a "riseball" can be located other than up at the batter's chin. (in other words: a "high fastball is NOT a riseball...)

Imagine seeing this pitch in the batter's box, after seeing a couple of drop balls (that hit the plate) before it.
If you don't think this "low rise" would lock you up, you are mistaken!

The concept is called "tunneling":
Pitches start out from the same initial (first 10', or tunnel) trajectory, but spin "breaks" the ball to a very different location once it reaches home plate.
 
Last edited:
Apr 28, 2014
1,277
63
This is a good example of a "low rise".
Seems oxymoron-ish, but if you consider a "rise" to be about spin axis, and not about location, then a "riseball" can be located other than up at the batter's chin. (in other words: a "high fastball is NOT a riseball...)

Imagine seeing this pitch in the batter's box, after seeing a couple of drop balls (that hit the plate) before it.
If you don't think this "low rise" would lock you up, you are mistaken!

The concept is called "tunneling":
Pitches start out from the same initial (first 10', or tunnel) trajectory, but spin "breaks" the ball to a very different location once it reaches home plate.

 

sluggers

Super Moderator
Staff member
May 26, 2008
6,026
113
Dallas, Texas
The concept is called "tunneling":
Pitches start out from the same initial (first 10', or tunnel) trajectory, but spin "breaks" the ball to a very different location once it reaches home plate.
The concept is spot on (I've never heard it called "tunneling".)

The true key to effective breaking pitches is to make them difficult to detect. The arm motion and flight path have to be almost identical.

People forget that breaking pitches are compared to the pitcher's other pitches. A riseball that jumps 12 inches is worthless if the good batters can detect the pitch at or before release.

Here is a video about Mariano Rivera, explaining the concept.

 
Apr 28, 2014
1,277
63
That is a really cool video
That's why IMO a pitcher who can throw a rise and flip change back to back can be deadly.
My DD is perfecting her rise but even with it at 85% and her flip at 95% she led our state in strikeouts as a sophomore. She's not a fire baller but man those poor girls get fooled so much with her rise and change together.

Here's a HS playoff game (1 inning) where she was using both pitches to keep em off balance.

 
Last edited:
Jul 31, 2019
117
28
That's why IMO a pitcher who can throw a rise and flip change back to back can be deadly.
My DD is perfecting her rise but even with it at 85% and her flip at 95% she led our state in strikeouts as a sophomore. She's not a fire baller but man those poor girls get fooled so much with her rise and change together.

Here's a HS playoff game (1 inning) where she was using both pitches to keep em off balance.

Very impressive. How hard is she throwing?
 

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