Welcome to Discuss Fastpitch

Your FREE Account is waiting to the Best Softball Community on the Web.

Register Log in

When to move on from pitching coach

Aug 30, 2014
63
8
Central Ohio
Agree with a change is sometimes a good thing. We are lucky that we have two ladies that work together but are 30 miles apart. Started with the first one and then Switched do to closer distance and also her and DD really clicked. What I really like about both are they firmly believe once the foundation has been worked on and is solid, lessons she be once a month unless run in to a hick up and need some extra attention. They are not trying to milk you for excess visits.
 

Vertigo

Jersey Girl
May 27, 2013
542
43
I honestly can’t see dd moving on from her current PC. She’s been with him for 5 years and has been amazing with her. She has come such a long way with him, and he never lets up on her. She still improves under his guidance, as well.

She is 16 and will typically go about twice per month now. That changed depending on the season.
 

sluggers

Super Moderator
Staff member
May 26, 2008
6,216
113
Dallas, Texas
Once a kid has the basic motion down, then the kid doesn't need lessons every week. But, when she sees a coach, she needs an hour or more. The PC needs to see the kids entire pitching workout. She needs to throw 3 or 4 times a week on her own. (I'm not a fan of the 30 minute lesson.)

There isn't any magic in becoming a good pitcher. It is a lot of hard, boring work.
 
Last edited:
Oct 4, 2018
1,491
113
I honestly can’t see dd moving on from her current PC. She’s been with him for 5 years and has been amazing with her. She has come such a long way with him, and he never lets up on her. She still improves under his guidance, as well.

She is 16 and will typically go about twice per month now. That changed depending on the season.
There's a lot of risk moving away from a great coach. Yes, you can always come right back if you part amicably.
 
Oct 4, 2018
1,491
113
Once a kid has the basic motion down, then the kid doesn't need lessons every week. But, when she sees a coach, she needs an hour or more. The PC needs to see the kids entire pitching workout. She needs to throw 3 or 4 times a week on her own. (I'm not a fan of the 30 minute lesson.)

There isn't any magic in becoming a good pitcher. It is a lot of hard, boring work.
I hear ya. We're doing 30 minute lessons and they are so fast. Feels too fast. My DD is 9, so not really a concern yet. And we arrive 20 minutes early and warm up well so that the 30 minutes is all useful. I do think we'll move to an hour once or twice a month a year or so from now.
 
Feb 3, 2010
5,377
63
Pac NW
IMO you are at the point where once every 2 weeks is enough now. Once the fundamental mechanics are down, you enter a phase of refining her skills versus building the foundation and that is done in the backyard, not at lessons. A pitching coach is essentially a consultant. You go to them for direction and then you do the actual work at home..

Regarding the coach, I think it's time you move on to a new one. Sounds as if this one is not fully committed to being a pitching coach. Get someone who makes a living doing it. They will be more invested.
100% agree with everything in the first paragraph.

I don't think it's critical that a PC is a full time instructor. Some of the best PC's I know are part timers. I'm aware of a number full timers who I would generally not recommend.
 
Jul 1, 2019
107
28
We've been with our pitching coach for two years. We typically see him once a week especially during the leadup to a fall/spring season. Our sessions are typically 1 1/2 hr with some breaks built in (it gives her a few minutes to relax her focus, grab a drink, and we talk about what we're doing and why), then back at it hard for another 20-25min. Once or twice a month, PC's DD (D-II pitcher) comes to help as well, which is amazing because my DD relates to her very well.

Like it has been mentioned, most of the work and progress has came from the hundreds of hours spent without the coach. At every lesson, I ask for homework, three things to focus on for the week. That's what DD and I focus on during our 3-4 sessions until we see him again.

We've occasionally visited a pitching camp or two, maybe even seen another coach for a couple of sessions just to see if they see something we're missing. A couple of times we've walked away with a tidbit that made a big improvement, sometimes just a small tweak that helped.
 
Mar 28, 2014
589
63
100% agree with everything in the first paragraph.

I don't think it's critical that a PC is a full time instructor. Some of the best PC's I know are part timers. I'm aware of a number full timers who I would generally not recommend.
Your experience differs from mine then. I understand it isn't a guarantee that a full time coach will be the best. I do feel like it gives you a better shot at finding a good one though.
 
Apr 17, 2019
40
8
Once a kid has the basic motion down, then the kid doesn't need lessons every week. But, when she sees a coach, she needs an hour or more. The PC needs to see the kids entire pitching workout. She needs to throw 3 or 4 times a week on her own. (I'm not a fan of the 30 minute lesson.)

There isn't any magic in becoming a good pitcher. It is a lot of hard, boring work.
Ya we have never done 30 minute lessons, I feel like hour lessons are sometimes not enough. As far as her progressing, she's kind of plateaued simple because we have not been throwing enough the last few months, that is changing though.
 
Apr 28, 2014
1,546
83
I can see the difference when DD doesn't go to lessons on consistent basis (1X per week). During HS playoffs last season she didn't have a lesson in 4-5 weeks. She was effective but I could see some bad habits starting to form. The longer you wait the harder it is to break bad habits. And yes. may of us on here know the mechanics pretty well but our DD's respond better to someone else saying it. I don't like that fact but I won't fight it. Not worth it to me
 
Top