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Don't swing at a change-up with less than 2 strikes?

Sep 29, 2014
2,338
83
NOT!

As a hitter if you are ready and have a feel that she might pitch a change up why not? If the pitcher has a good change and uses it often and she throws a ball or two and then you foul off a pitch you might even sit change on a change.

If you can't really catch her FB but did manage to make some lucky contact and foul one off why not sit change.

Have you and your teammates been really paying attention and picked up a tell, sit on it and rip it.

Slapping lefty and fooled a little but can still just bang it into the ground why not.

I'm just not sold on many absolutes when it comes to counts and situations...if you have a good hitter in the box and she think she can drive the ball...let them swing.
 
May 24, 2013
10,704
113
So Cal
Depends. If the hitter has the adjustability in their swing to be able to hit it hard, do it. If you can't make a decent swing, gamble for another chance at something better.
 
Feb 7, 2013
3,188
48
My thought is if you never swing at a change-up with less than 2 strikes, as a pitching coach, guess what two pitches I'm going to call to get ahead in the count? As a batter if I can recognize a pitch as a change-up and I can get a good swing on it, why in the world would I just let it go by and get behind 0-2?

There's a frequent poster in the technical hitting forum that swears by the phrase "don't swing at change-ups unless you have 2 strikes" because you want to hit "your" pitch not the pitcher's pitch. Was just curious what others teach and why?
 

ArmyStrong

Going broke on softball
Sep 14, 2014
87
8
Pacific NW
Depends. If the hitter has the adjustability in their swing to be able to hit it hard, do it. If you can't make a decent swing, gamble for another chance at something better.
Definitely agree. Pitchers will throw change-ups all day if the batters slow down their swing to make contact. Makes for good infield and popup practice. Once batters learn to sit a little and swing hard at change-ups then they can make pitchers pay.
 
Jul 16, 2013
3,378
113
Pennsylvania
My thought is if you never swing at a change-up with less than 2 strikes, as a pitching coach, guess what two pitches I'm going to call to get ahead in the count? As a batter if I can recognize a pitch as a change-up and I can get a good swing on it, why in the world would I just let it go by and get behind 0-2?

There's a frequent poster in the technical hitting forum that swears by the phrase "don't swing at change-ups unless you have 2 strikes" because you want to hit "your" pitch not the pitcher's pitch. Was just curious what others teach and why?
If you are prepared to hit it, why not? And I agree with your other point. DD is a pitcher so I am perfectly fine if the other team refuses to swing at her change up :)


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May 17, 2012
1,995
63
If you don't swing at the change and I identify that as your strategy you will see nothing but change-ups early in the count. Defensively we are tracking pitches so it becomes apparent quickly who is swinging at what.

If you face a pitcher who's primary pitch is her change-up (60% of her pitches are change ups) you are in trouble.

The reason coaches don't want you to swing at the change-up with less than two strikes is that the batter(s) do not know how to resist and properly hit a change-up (so what difference does it make).

A pitcher that throws a good change-up isn't betting that someone can't hit it. They are betting that three hitters in a row can't do it (which would lead to runs being scored).
 
Jul 16, 2013
3,378
113
Pennsylvania
If you don't swing at the change and I identify that as your strategy you will see nothing but change-ups early in the count. Defensively we are tracking pitches so it becomes apparent quickly who is swinging at what.

If you face a pitcher who's primary pitch is her change-up (60% of her pitches are change ups) you are in trouble.

The reason coaches don't want you to swing at the change-up with less than two strikes is that the batter(s) do not know how to resist and properly hit a change-up (so what difference does it make).

A pitcher that throws a good change-up isn't betting that someone can't hit it. They are betting that three hitters in a row can't do it (which would lead to runs being scored).
Bold above... We do that too. In fact during the summer we spent a great deal of time with our pitchers and catchers to recognize certain patterns. We have our catchers call pitches, and they will try their best to exploit anything the hitter gives them. Myself and the other coaches will often speak to the battery in between innings, but they do a great job picking things up on their own. In most cases they are talking to each other and the coaches don't even need to get involved. I place a premium on smart players...
 
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