Runner tag-up after Infield Fly?

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Jan 1, 2024
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The infield fly is in effect by rule when the ball leaves the bat. There can be no force play because the batter is out immediately. Eliminating the force is the reason the I.F. was invented. Also by rule, the umpire is supposed to call it as soon as he/she recognizes it whether during the ball's flight or after the fact. Since it is a fly ball that can be caught, runners must tag up and not leave the bag before the ball is touched (not necessarily caught). Leaving early is appealable by the defense. If the I.F. becomes a foul ball, the ball becomes dead as with any foul ball and the I.F. is negated. If asked, way too many umpires will incorrectly tell you that the batter is not out until it is determined that the ball is not foul. Here is a great study in why it is important that everyone (especially umpires) understand the details of the infield fly rule.
 
May 29, 2015
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The infield fly is in effect by rule when the ball leaves the bat.[/MEDIA]

Ehhh . . . It is already in effect at the time of the pitch, as it is based on runner(s) positions and outs. It should be called when the ball is at its apex (not always easy), and if there is a possibility of it being foul, the umpire should use "Infield fly IF FAIR!" for the verbal call. That either gives us a batter who is out or a foul ball.
 
Jan 1, 2024
76
18
Ehhh . . . It is already in effect at the time of the pitch, as it is based on runner(s) positions and outs. It should be called when the ball is at its apex (not always easy), and if there is a possibility of it being foul, the umpire should use "Infield fly IF FAIR!" for the verbal call. That either gives us a batter who is out or a foul ball.
Yes... If an infield pop-up is actually hit, the conditions for an Infield Fly are there at the time of the pitch. Unfortunately, the "if fair" verbage leads some umpires (and umpire groups) to incorrectly interpret that the batter is not out during the time between contact and when the ball is actually ruled fair or foul. If the batter commits interference during the flight of the ball it must be interpreted to be "retired batter interference". The video illustrates the importance of umpires knowing the difference. If fair, regular interference results in one-out on the play. Retired batter (or runner) interference results in two outs on the play. If foul, the play is simply nullified.
 
May 29, 2015
3,851
113
Giving the like, but your last statement is not correct.

Schrodinger's Batter . . . they are simultaneously not out and out. They aren't out until they are out, but they have no legal reason to attempt to advance as they are either out or it is a foul ball.

If fair, the batter is out and you have retired runner interference (as applied in the video).

If foul, the batter is not out, you have batter-runner interference, and now the batter is out. The play is not nullified.
 

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