Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Strength for 8u and 6u players

  1. #1
    Checking out the clubhouse medic37's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Strength for 8u and 6u players

    I have a 7 y/o and a 6y/o and looking to improving their throwing and batting strength, what are good ways to improve this at this age?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Always learning... Eric F's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    8,858
    Thanks
    5,611
    Thanked 6,849 Times in 3,531 Posts

    Default

    Play catch and hit balls.


    Also...Welcome to DFP!
    Last edited by Eric F; 01-03-2019 at 03:03 PM.
    A TB parent's life...Drive. Write checks. Eat tacos.

  3. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Eric F For This Useful Post:

    Ken B (01-04-2019), uncdrew (01-07-2019)

  4. #3
    Always learning... Eric F's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    8,858
    Thanks
    5,611
    Thanked 6,849 Times in 3,531 Posts

    Default

    Okay...maybe a little bit more detailed response...

    At this very-young age, I'm not a fan of exercises specifically for strength-building. Focus on mechanics and make sure their bodies are using good movement patterns. Increased strength with inefficient mechanics is not a good path. Build throwing strength by throwing a lot. Playing catch with a partner brings in the accuracy component to throwing (which is also a critical item), and improves glove skills. Hitting balls - tee is okay, front toss is better - with the goal of hitting them as far as they can is always a good thing (at any age).
    A TB parent's life...Drive. Write checks. Eat tacos.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to Eric F For This Useful Post:

    Ken B (01-04-2019)

  6. #4
    Checking out the clubhouse BruinCarl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    From 5YO to about 9/10YO the focus should be on mechanics and explosiveness. Get the child to do the arm pattern/swing pattern correctly to optimize the current physical capacity. Then add distance for throwing. Jaeger long toss is a prime example of just feed the arm. If your child hits or pitches, get her to do that as explosive as she can while maintaining proper mechanics. Same thing with hitting. The body has to feel that and the more they do it and begin to understand their bodies, the better they'll become. You as the instructor have to be intentional about it, they won't understand. Doing speed and agility exercises (platforms, ladders, hurdles) help them understand the feeling of being explosive. Now is the time to learn that. It is difficult to learn that once they are older. Once they're around 9/10YO then flexibility becomes a prime focus. The body isn't prepared for strength training until around 16YO on average.
    Last edited by BruinCarl; 01-03-2019 at 06:43 PM.

  7. #5
    #10
    #10 is offline
    I can talk softball all day #10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    In search of the perfect folding chair...
    Posts
    358
    Thanks
    188
    Thanked 145 Times in 87 Posts

    Default

    How about letting them play on the monkeybars?

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to #10 For This Useful Post:

    grcsftbll (01-04-2019)

  9. #6
    I can talk softball all day Rolling Hard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    449
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 90 Times in 72 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by #10 View Post
    How about letting them play on the monkeybars?
    Exactly what i was thinking. Monkey bars, swings, rock wall, caoture the flag, high skips and jumping jacks.

  10. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Rolling Hard For This Useful Post:

    #10 (01-04-2019), grcsftbll (01-04-2019)

  11. #7
    I'm a fan CanOfCorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    80
    Thanks
    74
    Thanked 61 Times in 37 Posts

    Default

    I wouldn’t concern myself too much with strength training at this age. Focus on building motor skills and agility. They will get stronger no matter what and their bodies will handle it better at an older age. The next couple years they learn to be an athlete and don’t underestimate how much that is noticed by coaches in all sports at all levels.

    For throwing I would zero in on technique (talked about all over DFP) and add some long toss in (relative to age).

    CoC




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  12. #8
    I can talk softball all day uncdrew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    141
    Thanks
    109
    Thanked 62 Times in 38 Posts

    Default

    When my daughter started the sport at 8, she was weak with the throw, weak hitting, etc.

    Honestly, just playing catch a lot (with good form) and she's now a 9 year old third baseman and the only one on the team that can make that long throw consistently. I never even told her I was stepping one step further from her each month as we played catch in the driveway.

  13. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to uncdrew For This Useful Post:

    CanOfCorn (01-07-2019), Eric F (01-07-2019)

  14. #9
    I'm a fan lancer360's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    82
    Thanks
    91
    Thanked 29 Times in 20 Posts

    Default

    My DD is 9 and one thing that shows up when doing one arm at a time batting drills is her left arm strength (lack of strength). We like to play catch and work on increasing distance until her right arm is tired as well as hitting off the tee and front toss, side toss, etc., but this mainly works on the dominate arm. Any drill recommendations that help work on the weak arm?

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

  15. #10
    I can talk softball all day uncdrew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    141
    Thanks
    109
    Thanked 62 Times in 38 Posts

    Default

    I'd keep doing what you're doing lancer. For one-arm drills I went to Walmart where they sell t-ball bats for $7. Picked up a 24 inch one for one-arm drills. I'm not sure many of our 9U girls could do one-arm drills with their normal bat.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •