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Workout Routines

May 7, 2008
2
0
Marc - this looks like it will be very helpful for the softball community.

One question I have been meaning to ask you (and others) is related to weight training for pitchers. My daughter is 10 and tall (5' 3'') and I want to help her build more strenght to help her with pitching and hitting. Is she too young?

Feedback welcome.
 
I would definately be afraid to put a 10yr old on a "strength building" weight program. If you are talking about arm strength, have her do her pitching drills with a 12" ball (after warm-up)
Does any one have an opinion of the "Finch Windmill"? It is fairly expensive, but I have seen pretty good results from continuous use...
 
May 7, 2008
1
0
I did not start letting my daughter work out with light weights until 13. The reason for this is I've been told by various sources it can damage the growth plates. Even at 14 I only used weighted ball (9 ounces) and 5lb dumb bells. She is now almost 15 and using a weighted bat and 8lb dumb bells. I have heard varoius takes on the use of weights with pitchers. I doubt you wil find a concrete plan to follow that everyone agrees upon.
 

pdj

May 7, 2008
26
0
Strong Fingers

An area that many overlook are the forearm, upper arm, fingers and hands.

Students are encouraged to get with a good trainer for general conditioning specific to pitching. They are also encouraged to get with their medical provider to review the pitching and exercise mechanics.

From my experience many MDs and trainers can evaluate and help with the mechanics of the pitch but, they do may not have an understanding specific to spinning the ball.

Finger pressure is how I want to spin the ball. The muscles of the hand/arm are used to deliver the ball and apply this spin.

It has been my experience that an experienced male pitcher will often spin the ball much tighter than a female pitcher. This is evident even at slower speeds. Finger pressure and the muscles that apply it seems very important to bending the pitch.
 

Amy in AZ.

Super Moderator
May 7, 2008
8,507
48
Tucson
Try a theraband workout. The bands come in different strengths and can be used anywhere. Be sure and do the exercises on both sides to avoid a muscle imbalance. Also, stretches and arm circles are good.
 
May 7, 2008
6
0
workout routines

For a 10 year old I would stick to working on arm speed and include distance pitching 35 feet, 40ft 45ft etc etc 5-7 throws per distance. I too would avoid any type of weight lifting program as I actually have been told by an orthopedic surgeon that 14 years old would be the ideal age. Working slowly allow the girls to mature naturally.
I do have a 16 year old pitcher who is very physically fit and this past winter was her first serious 4-5 times a week, workout with a personal trainer. She had gone light lifting the winter before
Good luck to you.
 
May 7, 2008
2
0
Estancia NM
I would definately be afraid to put a 10yr old on a "strength building" weight program. If you are talking about arm strength, have her do her pitching drills with a 12" ball (after warm-up)
Does any one have an opinion of the "Finch Windmill"? It is fairly expensive, but I have seen pretty good results from continuous use...
she is defanately too young for weights but you can do plyometrics and lots of push ups, sit-ups, negative pull ups, any thing using her own body weight for resistance. lots of reps.
 

Amy in AZ.

Super Moderator
May 7, 2008
8,507
48
Tucson
I agree with George.

You should see the number of 10 YOs at my lessons that are overweight. I think people should encourage their girls (pitchers or not) to run, bike and hike.) It wouldn't hurt some of the folks to go with them, either.

All kids should be getting a daily regimen of physical activity, like most of us had in elementary school.

Exercises specific to pitching are great.

I understand no weight training until at least teen years.
 
May 7, 2008
235
0
Hi there.

I have a friend whose son plays AAA Hockey at the Bantam level for a major NHL team. The boy is 15 years old, and his hockey coach told his parents to cross train him in a gymnastics facility. I just accepted a job at a local gymnastics facility and have had my eyes opened to the benefits of plyometrics (jumping), balance, resistance training, hand stand push ups, trampoline and may other ways of developing upper and lower body strength. His results began showing immediately. Upon further exploration, it seems that this type of training is foundational for any athletic development in any sport. I have a daughter 12U Softball pitcher and infielder, and a son 11U Baseball pitcher and infielder. Gymnasts have an edge in other sports due to their flexibility, balance, and incredible strength. My children are signed up for privates this summer.

Ang
 
Purpose For Weight Training

I prefer to think first of weight training, plyometrics, etc. as a means to strengthen the muscles, tendons, and legiments that hold the joints together. The primary purpose is to avoid injury, the secondary purpose is to promote coordination/balance, and thirdly to strengthen so as to be more explosive with the ballistic movements involved in pitching.
Young female pitchers put a lot of stress on their joints---make certain they can handle it.
Rick
 

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