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When does daughter handle her own problems

Jun 16, 2008
23
0
My daughter and her new team have a new coach who is frustrating them by doing things his way. It is different from all of their high school training and while they are trying to do what the coach wants, it is confusing and causing errors. My question is this: at 16U I feel they need to take it upon themselves to talk to the coach as a team and not have the parents interfere. Am I right? As a parent I am concerned about saying anything because we don't want to come off as problem parents, but the players are getting frustrated and quite frankly so are we. The assistant coaches have tried to express their concerns, but it is not working. Any ideas or comments?
 
May 9, 2008
98
0
Communication

Hi,

I agree that the players should take the initiative to talk with their new coach. Sometimes that's hard to do but it is necessary to have open lines of communication. It sounds like it's a new situation for the coach, your daughter, and her teammates. That makes it a perfect opportunity for the players to try something new. Have them muster the courage to address the situation openly.

Coaches have their own way of doing things. New coaches are trying to do what they know has worked for them in the past in a new setting. Have the players talk with him and bring the issues out into the open. Everyone will benefit.

You are right in not wanting to be the parent who gets the party started. The girls are 16u, that's High School age, they can handle it themselves. Perhaps the players can get together on their own, figure out the top three issues and appoint a representative to talk to the coach. Or maybe everyone needs to be there and they can ask the coach for a team meeting to discuss the top three concerns.

Communication is a two way street it's important to talk and address these topics in a way that is beneficial to all. The Coach if he's worth his salt will be open to his teams needs. Since the Asst. Coaches haven't been successful a way just needs to be found to break the ice. I think if the girls come to the coach he will listen.

Best Regards,

Pops
 
May 7, 2008
110
0
Mom,

If you could site an example of what this coach is doing it would help.

Doing things differently than what is done in high school is pretty common. HS ball tends to be a giant step below TB and IN GENERAL, HS coaches tend to be literature teachers that need a few extra bucks. I know some HS coaches are very good, but the talent level of the girls is generally considerably below a 16U team. In Tennessee, most 14U teams would beat most HS teams.

Keith
 
May 7, 2008
235
0
As a parent, it is difficult to know where the lines are between allowing your athlete to advocate for themselves and when to step in. I find this is also true in school with teachers. I believe the process for parents/children in adolesence is gradual as letting out weighted rope, and I also think it is important to model for children what healthy advocacy looks like. I would agree, Frustrated, that by 16 we hope the parents are encouraging and athletes are taking more responsibility for their sport (including team communication).

Diplomacy and openmindedness are attributes of good leaders, however, not all leaders are able to determine good direction. A good coach would be exploring the source of the errors and talking with players. Big Daddy makes a point that more specifics would be needed to give the most accurate feedback.

You may want to suggest players speak to him individually first before approaching him in numbers because he may feel attacked; take a defensive posture; and close his mind to what really needs to be said and heard.

Good luck,

Ang
 
Jun 16, 2008
23
0
When does your daughter handle her own problems

We live in a very competitive area outside of Chicago and most of the HS coaches are pretty knowledgeable. They deal with a lot of politics, but overall are OK. Our players come from various hs teams in the area. Many are on this team simply to be able to get on their hs team next spring.

The issue plaguing us is basically bunt coverage and who covers what. We aren't necessarily the most competitive team in the area & this coverage issue is confusing & frustrating for many of the girls who don't have a lot of experience or knowledge.
 

Amy in AZ.

Super Moderator
May 7, 2008
8,508
48
Tucson
Bunt coverage. Then, an infielder needs to say "Coach, I am beyond confused. So, maybe some others are, too. Could you please walk me through this again?"

Then, if a dialogue opens up she can say, "I used to do it like this. ....... that is why I am confused."

It might be that the coach is right or just trying to introduce an advanced play. Or maybe he/she is wrong. But sometimes we have to do what the boss says and then move on at the first opportunity.
 
Jun 16, 2008
23
0
Thanks for the input. Your insight about maybe it being a more advanced coverage might be right. We are used to the corners moving up for bunt coverage, but our coach is trying to have 2nd base cover instead of 1st. It is causing errors because the 2nd basemen just cant cover so much ground since he has her playing fairly deep. I will be sure to discuss this with my daughter and have her weigh her options.
 

Amy in AZ.

Super Moderator
May 7, 2008
8,508
48
Tucson
No, 2nd can cover those bunts. A really quick girl (like a volleyball player) can cover a lot more area than some first baseman. But, she does have to be in - or it leaves all of that area for the pitcher to handle.

I am thinking that the coach is thinking that he wants a "shift" on in case that bunt turns into a slap.

Is the 1st baseman moving off the line and to her right, during this play?
 

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