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Video of big hitters striking out

Aug 1, 2017
7
0
I am looking for video of confident, big hitters striking out. My DD has one of the best swings on the team and has been the best hitter in practice for a while, but when she gets to games, the confidence isn't there and she starts swinging for contact. She hates to swing and miss. Her role on the team is to hit long, not a contact hitter. I am hoping to show her some hitters striking out and there response to try to ease her fear of failure, but I am finding it hard to get clips.

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May 24, 2013
9,601
83
So Cal
I am looking for video of confident, big hitters striking out. My DD has one of the best swings on the team and has been the best hitter in practice for a while, but when she gets to games, the confidence isn't there and she starts swinging for contact. She hates to swing and miss. Her role on the team is to hit long, not a contact hitter. I am hoping to show her some hitters striking out and there response to try to ease her fear of failure, but I am finding it hard to get clips.

Sent from my SM-N920V using Tapatalk
How old is your DD?

There's a few things I did with my DD along the way that seemed to really help her...

Plate coverage - Working off a tee, I moved the ball around to edges of the strike zone - even slightly outside the zone - and asked her to hit the ball as hard as she could. Some spots took more work than others to get comfortable with, but progress was made. We talked about how she proved to herself that she can get her bat on the ball, and hit it pretty hard, no matter where it is. Let the pitcher worry about the strike zone. This is your "hitting zone". For my DD this really turned on a lightbulb.

At-bat approach - With 0-strikes, look for a pitch in your favorite location - your "hot zone" (know where that location is, and know what a pitch to that location looks like). If that pitch comes, be ready to destroy it. If you miss it, that's fine. If it's not in your "hot zone", and you let it go by for a strike, that's fine. You get more chances. With 1-strike, expand your zone to about the size of the strike zone. Be ready to hit anything in that zone. With 2-strikes, the "hitting zone" (above) comes into play. If you can get your bat on it, do it. If you can't, it's probably way out of the zone, anyway, and a good one to let go. Pretty often, pitches around the limits of the zone will get fouled off. This is good! It means you just gave the pitcher another chance to throw a pitch you really like. My DD continues to approach her at-bats this way, and she's pretty successful, including being a very dangerous 2-strike hitter.

Attitude - Hitting can't be done meekly. It's a battle with the pitcher, and winning it starts with attitude. The best description of the right attitude I've heard is to be a "predator" (thanks, FFS). You're in the box to hunt and destroy. Putting the ball in play isn't enough. Hit it hard! Early on, I asked my DD to play an acting game. Try to make the pitcher think you're the best hitter on the team before she even throws the first pitch. It's about body language - confidence and swagger. I don't care if you don't feel that way inside. Fake it. If you give up with your attitude before you even step in the box, you've already lost the battle. Over time, what started as faking turned into real confidence as her success grew.
 
Last edited:
Oct 1, 2014
946
28
USA
How old is your DD?

There's a few things I did with my DD along the way that seemed to really help her...

Plate coverage - Working off a tee, I moved the ball around to edges of the strike zone - even slightly outside the zone - and asked her to hit the ball as hard as she could. Some spots took more work than others to get comfortable with, but progress was made. We talked about how she proved to herself that she can get her bat on the ball, and hit it pretty hard, no matter where it is. Let the pitcher worry about the strike zone. This is your "hitting zone". For my DD this really turned on a lightbulb.

At-bat approach - With 0-strikes, look for a pitch in your favorite location - your "hot zone" (know where that location is, and know what a pitch to that location looks like). If that pitch comes, be ready to destroy it. If you miss it, that's fine. If it's not in your "hot zone", and you let it go by for a strike, that's fine. You get more chances. With 1-strike, expand your zone to about the size of the strike zone. Be ready to hit anything in that zone. With 2-strikes, the "hitting zone" (above) comes into play. If you can get your bat on it, do it. If you can't, it's probably way out of the zone, anyway, and a good one to let go. Pretty often, pitches around the limits of the zone will get fouled off. This is good! It means you just gave the pitcher another chance to throw a pitch you really like. My DD continues to approach her at-bats this way, and she's pretty successful, including being a very dangerous 2-strike hitter.

Attitude - Hitting can't be done meekly. It's a battle with the pitcher, and winning it starts with attitude. The best description of the right attitude I've heard is to be a "predator" (thanks, FFS). You're in the box to hunt and destroy. Putting the ball in play isn't enough. Hit it hard! Early on, I asked my DD to play an acting game. Try to make the pitcher think you're the best hitter on the team before she even throws the first pitch. It's about body language - confidence and swagger. I don't care if you don't feel that way inside. Fake it. If you give up with your attitude before you even step in the box, you've already lost the battle. Over time, what started as faking turned into real confidence as her success grew.
Nicely done Eric, I really like the way you worded all of that. Be a Predator...hunt for your pitch and it's always yes, yes until it's no!
 
Jun 17, 2009
15,129
0
Portland, OR
Nicely done Eric, I really like the way you worded all of that. Be a Predator...hunt for your pitch and it's always yes, yes until it's no!
Is the video description below truly correct?


Is there a 'Go!' decision in the swing?

Is a decision being made to 'stop the bat' with a swing that is always launched? Is it more that one is moving out in preparation to launch the swing'?
 
May 24, 2013
9,601
83
So Cal
Is the video description below truly correct?


Is there a 'Go!' decision in the swing?

Is a decision being made to 'stop the bat' with a swing that is always launched? Is it more that one is moving out in preparation to launch the swing'?
I would say that there should always be a preparation to launch on every pitch. IMO, this is what Enquist is talking about - intent and preparation to hit. Most times, the process will be aborted prior to launch. Less often, the process will be aborted after launch.

Young hitters adopting an "always yes, until it's no" mentality is a good thing.
 
Jun 17, 2009
15,129
0
Portland, OR
I would say that there should always be a preparation to launch on every pitch. IMO, this is what Enquist is talking about - intent and preparation to hit. Most times, the process will be aborted prior to launch. Less often, the process will be aborted after launch.

Young hitters adopting an "always yes, until it's no" mentality is a good thing.
EF, do you agree with the following ... “You swing at everything. Then you only have one decision to make, that’s to stop your bat when it’s out of the strike zone”.
 
May 24, 2013
9,601
83
So Cal
EF, do you agree with the following ... “You swing at everything. Then you only have one decision to make, that’s to stop your bat when it’s out of the strike zone”.
I don't agree in the literal sense of actually launching on every pitch. As I said, my take-away from Enquist's message is about intent and preparation. The anticipation that every pitch will be one to hit, and starting the process on every pitch, is the important part. How far the process goes will vary, but the process must get started.
 
Jun 17, 2009
15,129
0
Portland, OR
I don't agree in the literal sense of actually launching on every pitch. As I said, my take-away from Enquist's message is about intent and preparation. The anticipation that every pitch will be one to hit, and starting the process on every pitch, is the important part. How far the process goes will vary, but the process must get started.
I don't agree either.

Yes, you prepare to launch your swing on every pitch ... and yes, failure to adequately prepare leaves many young developing hitters unprepared to launch their swing.
 

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