Welcome to Discuss Fastpitch

Your FREE Account is waiting to the Best Softball Community on the Web.

Register Log in

TTB vs HTTB

Jul 29, 2013
1,032
63
I find that Yellich/Bonds drill circulating really interesting and maybe the first new/truly useful idea I've seen in a long time.

I agree hitters swing down. The hands and barrel start up here (points to shoulder) and end up down here (points to contact point). That's clearly down. But it's how you get down. And here I find the clock analogy often cited particularly useful. I like the idea that you start at 12 and the bat travels rearward down the back of the arc to a 6 oclock contact point. The 'clock' may be flatter on a high pitch and more oblong on a low pitch. But the barrel travels -- IS TURNED *DOWN* -- along that that reaward path. If you tip, the bat actually starts at something like 10 or 9 oclock and then reverses/gets turned to travel that path.

The other way to swing down is to start the barrel at something like 12 or even lay it back at 1 or 2 oclock and rather than turn it it around and down you cut 'across' the clock face directly to contact, A-to-C so to speak.

I wish I had access to a cage right now to play around with the Yellich drill, but I think you'll only hit the plate if you TURN THE BARREL DOWN vs. simply SWINGING DOWN. I think there's a difference and it's the way to reconcile the pro swing down feel with the pro real-world swing.

Maybe this is all obvious but it's useful to me and I think the Yellich hit-the-plate drill appears to be a great way to test the idea and over a period of time/over a hitting session groove a 'turn the barrel down' bat path.

And finally, I don't think that a turn-the-barrel-down bat path is at all natural or will simply happen if you have the right posture and sequence. Like many athletically advanced things, it's a bit counter-intuitive and becomes learned by most great hitters through trial and error and that efforts to 'teach' TTB isn't about forcing it but accelerating adaption and learning.
I'd like to see the Yellich-Bonds hit the plate drill just to see exactly what they're doing. Anyone have a video of that? Priceless!
 
May 12, 2016
2,975
113
I live for the asshole list..
I find that Yellich/Bonds drill circulating really interesting and maybe the first new/truly useful idea I've seen in a long time.

I agree hitters swing down. The hands and barrel start up here (points to shoulder) and end up down here (points to contact point). That's clearly down. But it's how you get down. And here I find the clock analogy often cited particularly useful. I like the idea that you start at 12 and the bat travels rearward down the back of the arc to a 6 oclock contact point. The 'clock' may be flatter on a high pitch and more oblong on a low pitch. But the barrel travels -- IS TURNED *DOWN* -- along that that reaward path. If you tip, the bat actually starts at something like 10 or 9 oclock and then reverses/gets turned to travel that path.

The other way to swing down is to start the barrel at something like 12 or even lay it back at 1 or 2 oclock and rather than turn it it around and down you cut 'across' the clock face directly to contact, A-to-C so to speak.

I wish I had access to a cage right now to play around with the Yellich drill, but I think you'll only hit the plate if you TURN THE BARREL DOWN vs. simply SWINGING DOWN. I think there's a difference and it's the way to reconcile the pro swing down feel with the pro real-world swing.

Maybe this is all obvious but it's useful to me and I think the Yellich hit-the-plate drill appears to be a great way to test the idea and over a period of time/over a hitting session groove a 'turn the barrel down' bat path.

And finally, I don't think that a turn-the-barrel-down bat path is at all natural or will simply happen if you have the right posture and sequence. Like many athletically advanced things, it's a bit counter-intuitive and becomes learned by most great hitters through trial and error and that efforts to 'teach' TTB isn't about forcing it but accelerating adaption and learning.
It's pretty simple.. the hit-the-plate drill involves same hand path(chop) with no posture and lacking sequence.. just using the hands to chop down on the ball off the plate.. and like I've been saying all along the barrel turns every swing. As the drill progresses the hitter develops better posture and sequence.. hand path stays the same.. .Then they slowly added the other important components back into the swing with the same hand path. Then Yelich starts raking it, line drive missles. The point of the drill is focus on hand path, Like Yelich saif, the drill cleaned it up. Don't know how anybody can put a TTB spin on that drill, but A for effort
 
Jan 13, 2020
573
43
I find that Yellich/Bonds drill circulating really interesting and maybe the first new/truly useful idea I've seen in a long time.

I agree hitters swing down. The hands and barrel start up here (points to shoulder) and end up down here (points to contact point). That's clearly down. But it's how you get down. And here I find the clock analogy often cited particularly useful. I like the idea that you start at 12 and the bat travels rearward down the back of the arc to a 6 oclock contact point. The 'clock' may be flatter on a high pitch and more oblong on a low pitch. But the barrel travels -- IS TURNED *DOWN* -- along that that reaward path. If you tip, the bat actually starts at something like 10 or 9 oclock and then reverses/gets turned to travel that path.

The other way to swing down is to start the barrel at something like 12 or even lay it back at 1 or 2 oclock and rather than turn it it around and down you cut 'across' the clock face directly to contact, A-to-C so to speak.

I wish I had access to a cage right now to play around with the Yellich drill, but I think you'll only hit the plate if you TURN THE BARREL DOWN vs. simply SWINGING DOWN. I think there's a difference and it's the way to reconcile the pro swing down feel with the pro real-world swing.

Maybe this is all obvious but it's useful to me and I think the Yellich hit-the-plate drill appears to be a great way to test the idea and over a period of time/over a hitting session groove a 'turn the barrel down' bat path.

And finally, I don't think that a turn-the-barrel-down bat path is at all natural or will simply happen if you have the right posture and sequence. Like many athletically advanced things, it's a bit counter-intuitive and becomes learned by most great hitters through trial and error and that efforts to 'teach' TTB isn't about forcing it but accelerating adaption and learning.
This just came out today. Informative!

- My Thoughts on Christian Yelich Talking Barry Bonds Hitting Drill
 

TDS

Mar 11, 2010
1,810
63
Sounds like he had the same issues Tewks had.. Swinging down with an abaf movement pattern..

 
Apr 11, 2015
629
43
This just came out today. Informative!

- My Thoughts on Christian Yelich Talking Barry Bonds Hitting Drill
Antonelli is a well informed, and outstanding hitting instructor. I've recommended his Youtube channel to many looking for some video format material on how to swing a bat.
 
May 12, 2016
2,975
113
Sounds like he had the same issues Tewks had.. Swinging down with an abaf movement pattern..

Yep.. Even the way he explains, showing the bat coming down way in front of the shoulder.
Antonelli is a well informed, and outstanding hitting instructor. I've recommended his Youtube channel to many looking for some video format material on how to swing a bat.
Well spoken, easy to understand, and not constantly trying to prove himself
 
Oct 13, 2014
2,818
83
South Cali
Antonelli should really rehearse before doing videos. It’s like pulling teeth waiting for the guy to get to get to the point. Can’t stand his videos. Justin Stone may yell at you, but he gets to the point.
 

Latest posts

Forum statistics

Threads
35,891
Messages
537,683
Members
16,754
Latest member
ronaldandmel
Top