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Travel ball pracice

May 24, 2013
11,663
113
So Cal
Yes, but they live far away and they won't cross paths other than travel ball. But still, more friends and more people to see and talk to on future weekends over the years to come.
That has been my DD's entire TB journey until now. She's finally playing close to home, and has teammates that live in the same city. However, she still hasn't had a teammate that goes to the same school as her.
 
Nov 18, 2013
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Does she have aspirations to play in HS or beyond? She’s severely limiting her chances by being a PO on a B team. Even if she’s not looking to play competitively it’s just so wrong to hold a girl back like that on a developmental team.
 
Apr 28, 2014
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I guess it depends on the goal of the player.
My DD always had a goal of pitching in college. She was very good CF and at 14s and first year 18s they would put her in CF at times instead of pitching her more. Had she been a PO then she would have pitched more innings. Last 2 years as a PO she pitches a ton and its made her a much better pitcher.
 
Jan 17, 2020
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8
She says she wants to pitch in college. Being a PO may help that. She's working hard at it now. We'll see what happens.
 
Jun 20, 2015
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the smart money is for the majority of all players to be as skilled as possible in all positions. Obviously, being a lefty would put some limits on fielding positions. As would being a dominate D1, Monica Abbott type pitcher. Ever notice how many players on D1 rosters lists that they used to play another position, but now are starting CF or 2b, ETC??? because they are that good and are well versed at other positions. OR they can hit the snot out of the ball and the coach finds a way to get them on the field to keep bat in line up.

To decide at 14u on a B squad that said player is PO and wants to play in college, is extremely limiting. You know where any player is going to play in college? Where ever the coach puts her.

For grins and giggles, lets say player does find a school that wants her as PO. And she signs and gets to school. And here comes another recruit that pitches and also plays OF. Which one is more likely to get time on the field? OR a superstar transfers in as a #1 PO player. What happens to other PO type players? They just lost a huge hunk of possible circle time.
 
Apr 20, 2015
710
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Completely agree with all the posters here. Its time to have a serious talk with your daughter. If she truly does think she wants to pitch in college then being a PO on a B squad isn't going to cut it. She needs to really develop her game all around. If her goal is college then softball cant just be about loving her teammates and being comfortable. If her goal is just to have fun then that's 100% okay and she should stay where she is happiest. My daughter's team does have 1 PO as 2nd year 14u but they are a top 10 national team and that PO is a top 10 class of 2024 pitcher. The other two pitchers both play first for one and outfield for the other.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

Vertigo

Jersey Girl
May 27, 2013
1,008
113
I know I’ve said this before but DD’s versatility at different positions is what helped get her recruited. Since she is going D3 she will have the chance to play another position when she’s not pitching. As a slapper, the coaches said they want her in the lineup.

I know she’s no longer playing this year but I really admired Miranda Elish. Dominant D1 pitcher who would play the OF so they had her phenomenal bat in the lineup. Totally respected that! Not something you see too often.
 
Nov 18, 2013
2,074
113
She says she wants to pitch in college. Being a PO may help that. She's working hard at it now. We'll see what happens.
I understand the logic that working solely on pitching will elevate her skills to the point where she can play in college. 14U is just too young to be a PO. Wait until she’s committed as a pitcher to be a PO. Until then have her work on all her skills. The one thing most college players have in common is that they’re former pitchers who’s greatest potential lies elsewhere.

DD had a teammate who was a good pitcher, but fielding wasn’t up to par so she saw very little circle time. Things move a LOT faster in college and she’s going to need the skills both to protect herself and to field her position.

Best of luck whatever she chooses.
 
Apr 28, 2014
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There is something to be said for Pitchers who take part in all aspects of training even areas where they don't or won't see much action ie: diving drills. That being said your pitchers are the most valuable asset to the success of the team. Your coach needs to be in tune with all of the players and understand if something is causing pain. If a diving drill is causing pain that should be evident during the execution of the drill. That's her or his role as a coach. Your role as a parent, as you well know, is to ensure that your DD is not being put in spots where she is injuring herself. My DD goes to a gym that is totally female. She has been going for years. Last year she had some pain in an area that she hadn't experienced before. I don't go to the gym with her so I don't know what her program looks like. After a few questions it became obvious what was causing the issue. She wasn't willing to tell her trainer about it so I asked if I could. She said "Nope, I got it" and did. Changed the program and all is well. If she didn't feel comfortable I would have spoken up. Gotta do that as a parent.
Pitching only is not a bad thing and most top level pitchers do just that. At younger ages its not the best thing to peruse mainly because most girls pitch until 16 and decide its not right for them. If your a PO and make that decision at 16 your softball career is over. That being said DD knew she wanted to pitch, had that goal at 14 and went for it hard. She played some OF at 14's 16's and even first year 18's but 90% of her time was spent on pitching. There was no doubt in her mind that she wanted to pitch. If your DD is feeling the same way then go for it. There is a never ending need for quality pitching.
 
Last edited:
Feb 1, 2021
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Here is my typical, non-answer answer. It depends on the girl.

I know some POs that I would never even bother to put in the dirt. Period. They are very good pitchers, but athletically, clearly no amount of training is going to make them athletic enough to be taken seriously in the field. I would clear that kid, no problem. Heck one of the pitchers on my DDs team runs to first and its like pulling a stubborn mule to get her to even consider legging out a double. When you can pitch well, you can get away with that kind of stuff. Obviously you need to be pretty good to be able to get away with that though.

I know just as many kids that do the opposite as well. They are the best, most athletic player on the team and you want them in your lineup no matter what. That kid is going to have to put in the work. It may not be fair, but nothing ever is.

Both are perfectly acceptable. HS and college coaches, depending on what they need, will still be interested. I wouldn't worry to much about it. I would really hope if you talked to a coach about your feelings, they would take that into consideration. I consider myself a pretty serious minded person about sports, training, and winning, but pitchers are just way too valuable. Its the only spot on the field where being a diva can be ignored.
 
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