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Strength and Conditioning for Pitchers

Aug 12, 2018
25
13
Thanks for the bump. Good topic. Just a few ideas for the group to consider:

1) Strength is the ability to apply force.
2) Power is the ability to apply force quickly.
3) Pitchers need power.
4) Power is a function of Strength; therefore, one (likely the best) way to increase power is to increase strength.
5) The best way to improve strength is to use loaded compound movements like the following with a linear weight progression:
-The Squat (Strength Oriented)
-The Deadlift (Strength Oriented)
-The Power Clean (Power Oriented)
-The Overhead Press (Strength Oriented)
-The Bench Press (Strength Oriented - though I might advise avoiding this one given the complications it can cause in the shoulder joint.)

Joint stability movement patterns mentioned earlier in this thread are good, just not nearly as good as the fundamental movement patterns listed above because they isolate the muscle and limit the amount of load that can be lifted.

Given two pitchers of equal skill, the pitcher that deadlifts 405 can throw faster than the pitcher who deadlifts 135.

And for my most controversial statement: Developing strength is built by using a strength training program. Developing skill (like pitching) is done by practicing that skill. Both are necessary, however, when combining the two, the effectiveness of building both strength and skill is reduced.

Humbly, some references below for your reference.

 
Last edited:
Nov 8, 2018
709
63
Thanks for the bump. Good topic. Just a few ideas for the group to consider:

1) Strength is the ability to apply force.
2) Power is the ability to apply force quickly.
3) Pitchers need power.
4) Power is a function of Strength; therefore, one (likely the best) way to increase power is to increase strength.
5) The best way to improve strength is to use loaded compound movements like the following with a linear weight progression:
-The Squat (Strength Oriented)
-The Deadlift (Strength Oriented)
-The Power Clean (Power Oriented)
-The Overhead Press (Strength Oriented)
-The Bench Press (Strength Oriented - though I might advise avoiding this one given the complications it can cause in the shoulder joint.)

Joint stability movement patterns mentioned earlier in this thread are good, just not nearly as good as the fundamental movement patterns listed above because they isolate the muscle and limit the amount of load that can be lifted.

Given two pitchers of equal skill, the pitcher that deadlifts 405 can throw faster than the pitcher who deadlifts 135.

And for my most controversial statement: Developing strength is built by using a strength training program. Developing skill (like pitching) is done by practicing that skill. Both are necessary, however, when combining the two, the effectiveness of building both strength and skill is reduced.

Humbly, some references below for your reference.

Without stability within the joints that Girl lifting 400lbs will eventually blow something out without proper stability.
Works have and hand.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Oct 4, 2020
16
3
Without stability within the joints that Girl lifting 400lbs will eventually blow something out without proper stability.
Works have and hand.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I understand your point and would never disagree with the notion that unbalanced strength development is bad.

The idea I was trying to convey above is that when using a proper strength training program (rather than a physical therapy approach) weight is increased in a linear progression conservatively using whole body compound movements. That is, the starting weight is appropriately light to start in order to allow the novice to learn the movement patterns and then increased incrementally. This approach ensures the muscles (all the muscles involved not just stability muscles like the rotator cuff) are strengthened together in unison.

Compound movements increase the strength of all muscles, including those muscles that provide stability.
 
Feb 25, 2020
590
63
I understand your point and would never disagree with the notion that unbalanced strength development is bad.

The idea I was trying to convey above is that when using a proper strength training program (rather than a physical therapy approach) weight is increased in a linear progression conservatively using whole body compound movements. That is, the starting weight is appropriately light to start in order to allow the novice to learn the movement patterns and then increased incrementally. This approach ensures the muscles (all the muscles involved not just stability muscles like the rotator cuff) are strengthened together in unison.

Compound movements increase the strength of all muscles, including those muscles that provide stability.
What do you think about this opinion?

 
Oct 4, 2020
16
3
What do you think about this opinion?

Haha, when I first read the title of his video i thought "Uh no." But when you listen to his points, yes I might generally agree. When the weight gets as high as he mentions (600 lbs), yea I agree at that point you're a weightlifter that plays a sport rather than an athlete that lifts weights. I thought that was a great way to describe things. Recovery is something that can have a real impact on an athlete...and reduce performance in other areas...like their sport of choice. So, recovery management is key...which is where a good strength coach comes in.
 
Feb 25, 2020
590
63
Haha, when I first read the title of his video i thought "Uh no." But when you listen to his points, yes I might generally agree. When the weight gets as high as he mentions (600 lbs), yea I agree at that point you're a weightlifter that plays a sport rather than an athlete that lifts weights. I thought that was a great way to describe things. Recovery is something that can have a real impact on an athlete...and reduce performance in other areas...like their sport of choice. So, recovery management is key...which is where a good strength coach comes in.
Thanks for watching it. I tend to agree with him. Squatting made me better at squatting. I dont think it's recovery related either. I think it's more that squats and deads are long slow movements. Power vs strength like you mentioned. And I'm not sure how many softball players have a better strength coach than him. I'd bet it's statistically close to 0.

I'm not so sure anymore that squats and deadlifts are the best for athletes looking to become better athletes. I used to think they were.

I found this guy on youtube and was intrigued by his methods.


Sifting through his knee health obsession and other mumbo jumbo I kind of boiled it down to reverse step ups, atg lunges, nordics(!), and tibialis raises. A combo of mobility and posterior chain hammering IMO.

Ive been dabbling in it, doing those exercises (minus the nordics! Haha) before I do some KB exercises. And I can really feel my hammies gettin used way more.(kb swings). I was surprised by it.

Then you look at some of the foot doctor stuff about how the position of the foot can help recruit posterior chain usage...it explains his success with the tibialis raises.

I thought it was interesting and I think some of that stuff may be more worthwhile for softball players than squats and deads 2x a week.

Maybe something to look at. I still am.
 
Last edited:
Feb 25, 2020
590
63
I guess what I am saying is "starting strength" may be better than alot of stuff but is it the best for softball players(or anyone playing a sport).
 
Nov 8, 2018
709
63
I understand your point and would never disagree with the notion that unbalanced strength development is bad.

The idea I was trying to convey above is that when using a proper strength training program (rather than a physical therapy approach) weight is increased in a linear progression conservatively using whole body compound movements. That is, the starting weight is appropriately light to start in order to allow the novice to learn the movement patterns and then increased incrementally. This approach ensures the muscles (all the muscles involved not just stability muscles like the rotator cuff) are strengthened together in unison.

Compound movements increase the strength of all muscles, including those muscles that provide stability.
Agreed


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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