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Rear leg at heel plant?? Help

Jun 17, 2017
17
3
So my DD’s hitting instructor has always taught her to sort of fall forward to heel plant and lock the back leg. She’s been doing this for a while but as I’m starting to try to understand how the lower half works in the swing I’m not sure if this is correct. A straight leg doesn’t feel like you’re able to load the rear leg properly. What do you all say?
 
Jun 8, 2016
4,428
113
So my DD’s hitting instructor has always taught her to sort of fall forward to heel plant and lock the back leg. She’s been doing this for a while but as I’m starting to try to understand how the lower half works in the swing I’m not sure if this is correct. A straight leg doesn’t feel like you’re able to load the rear leg properly. What do you all say?
Not sure I follow but does what he/she is saying to do match with what you see in great hitters?
 
Nov 18, 2015
773
43
So my DD’s hitting instructor has always taught her to sort of fall forward to heel plant and lock the back leg. She’s been doing this for a while but as I’m starting to try to understand how the lower half works in the swing I’m not sure if this is correct. A straight leg doesn’t feel like you’re able to load the rear leg properly. What do you all say?
Drizzle,

Can you define "lock"? First time I read it, I assumed "lock" = "straight". Is that what he demonstrated? Now if "lock" = "fixed / maintains the same shape", that would better align with what actually happens, as rdb posted above - the rear leg definitely doesn't straighten, but it does maintain a bend throughout most of the swing (it rotates fwd, but is still bent). (Not implying that was what rdb was trying to show)

@rdbass - even thought I've watched this clip a thousand times over the years, I never noticed the back foot. Would you prefer the back foot to be facing home plate at plant (to better feel any loading into / around the hip), or is it a non-factor, since the foot clearly rotates forward during the swing?

Thx.
 

rdbass

It wasn't me.
Jun 5, 2010
8,821
63
Not here.
I never noticed the back foot. Would you prefer the back foot to be facing home plate at plant (to better feel any loading into / around the hip)
Game swing, yes. For this drill and think it's more of starting with your back pocket/hip toward the 'pitcher'.
 
May 24, 2013
10,571
113
So Cal
So my DD’s hitting instructor has always taught her to sort of fall forward to heel plant and lock the back leg. She’s been doing this for a while but as I’m starting to try to understand how the lower half works in the swing I’m not sure if this is correct. A straight leg doesn’t feel like you’re able to load the rear leg properly. What do you all say?
That sounds a whole lot like a shift-then-swing move, rather than the elite pattern of shift-and-swing.
 
Sep 17, 2009
1,442
63
That sounds a whole lot like a shift-then-swing move, rather than the elite pattern of shift-and-swing.
...And very 'linear throw the hands' old-school fastpitch-style. Dig into the technical hitting section if you're interested to understand where everyone is coming from or better yet take a video of your daughter and plenty of folks here can help....good luck.
 
Sep 29, 2014
2,193
83
The other thing to remember is these are drills....with drills we are trying to emphasize and focus on one area...this would be a great drill for someone with a very rotational swing that you wanted to "feel" the linear part of the swing more.
 
Jun 17, 2017
17
3
Thanks for the replies everyone. When I say a “straight back leg” I mean that at heel plant he wants her rear knee locked. It does sort of seem like a shift and then swing sort of method. It seems to me like that style doesn't give you much adjustability in the swing and it doesn't seem to allow her hips to rotate the way they should. Might be time for us to look for another instructor.
 

Cannonball

Ex "Expert"
Feb 25, 2009
4,011
83
Drizzle, the young man in this clip had outstanding instruction and his dad works tirelessly to try to get it right. You would do well to try to have your dd attempt to get on a similar path.

For the rest of this response, keep in mind that I am an ex expert. I use a cue for the back knee that is called the "knee chase." Many here don't like that cue. In fact, some really don't like it and we have had arguments here about it. However, take a look at that back knee and see the action as it chases the front knee. Like any cue, it has to be demonstrated and can be done incorrectly. BTW, if you notice the young man hitting above lands his front toe, goes to heel plant and that front knee was "soft" when the front toe hit. By soft, I mean bend and not ridgid. Now, before you are corrupted by my thoughts, go play one of those videos that have ocean waves crashing in making a soothing sound and refresh yourself mentally.
 
Sep 29, 2014
2,193
83
Most elite swing sequences have this micro second of timing between toe touch and heels plant that is the begining of the forward component of the swing. As you have probably heard before that motion starts from the ground up, so as the front heel comes down the back instep should be exerting force to unleash/uncoil your lower half, this is not an exact position the is the same for everyone each hitter varies slightly. I think the negative training might come in when the focus is on a static postion of the back knee being locked at x point, that is the result of dynamic force and is just a moment in time, I'm a huge proponent of stills but they have the downside of people thinking statically instead of dynamically.
 

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