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*POLL~ COACHES~ How would you like this get handled...

Handle issue by

  • 1. Umpire come to Coach about it first.

    Votes: 23 74.2%
  • 2. Umpire speaks to parent/fan first.

    Votes: 8 25.8%

  • Total voters
    31
Feb 13, 2021
383
43
MI
Read further...if it is at a tournament it could just be some Neanderthal who likes riding umpires or had an issue with a particular umpire in an earlier game or a loudmouth who is commenting on any close call (or not so close) just to make a point.

Regardless, an umpire had better be 100% sure before forfeiting game, and if a coach says "I have no idea who that idiot is" then there goes 100% certainty. Otherwise, we are right back to the home team being responsible for crowd control. The main point is that crowd issues are not umpire issues and if umpires need to get involved it will not end well.
 

Top_Notch

Screwball
Dec 18, 2014
416
43
Back when DD played 10U we had some raucous parents, personal party excluded. Thankfully, it wasn't the first go-round for our most level headed coach (he was a true ambassador to the sport). At the year end Nationals DD team was playing a very loud and poor sportsmanship type team. Needless to say, the heightened atmosphere generated a lot of comments and sounds during close and or questionable plays. The umpire went to our coach, and he came to our "cheering" section and basically said knock it off else I'll be gone! Our parents settled down but the opposing team did not. DD, a pitcher, waved "bye bye" after striking out a particularly loud kid and was warned by the HPU. I told her after the game that we don't condone such behavior but could certainly understand. Normally she's unflappable, but she said that player crossed the line with one of her comments. Deep down, I was proud of her, is that bad? We won the game, but it was a dogfight.
 
Feb 13, 2021
383
43
MI
I told her after the game that we don't condone such behavior but could certainly understand. Normally she's unflappable, but said they crossed the line with one of her comments. Deep down, I was proud of her, is that bad?

This is an excerpt from a REFEREE Magazine article about a NASO Summit regarding event security:

Joan Powell, the NCAA’s national coordinator of volleyball officiating, and Mark Uyl, director of officials for the Michigan High School Athletic Association, served as lead panelists for the session. Dan Olson, NASO Director of Audience Development, was the moderator.


The issue of obnoxious fans was raised. How do you handle the leather-lunged spectator who is chirping non-stop? Uyl and Powell each had a story that comes under the “Wouldn’t you love to do that?” category, but also comes with a strong warning not to emulate the officials involved.

A fan at a daylong wrestling tournament is constantly berating the officials. During a match in the championship round, the wrestlers go out of bounds and the fan again voices his displeasure with the officiating.

“The official gets the kids ready on the mat and says, ‘Wait right here,’” Uyl related. “The official leaves the mat, goes up the eight rows, into the crowd, down the row, right next to the dad, blows his whistle and says (to the competitors), ‘Wrestle.’ He turns to the dad next to him and says, ‘Apparently I can see everything I need to right next to you.’”

Although it was a Saturday, Uyl said someone called that night to report the official’s conduct. “I called the official first thing Monday morning. I said, ‘On the record, you can never do that again.’ I said, ‘Off the record, I want to shake your hand because what you did is something that anyone who has ever officiated … it’s at least gone through our mind once.’”

Powell’s story was virtually identical, except the venue was a volleyball tournament in Colorado. “The referee brings both captains together, explains something to them, dismisses them, beckons for serve, gets off the stand, and sits right next to a dad,” she said. “Play is going on. He blows his whistle, kills the ball, turns to the parent and says, ‘You are absolutely right. I can call a better game from right here.’”

The preferred method, Powell and Uyl agreed, is to let others deal directly with problem spectators.

“During a game I think there needs to be those very clear boundaries that spectators and others can never come onto the competition area,” Uyl said.

“No matter what happens, officials need to respect that same barrier going the other direction. That’s just a line we cannot cross. Never engage fans. If it gets bad enough, stop the game, go find game management and have the person removed. But never try and address a fan or try and make a point to a fan.”

TL: DR No, it isn't bad that you were proud of here. As long as you pointed out the RIGHT way to deal with it!!
 
Mar 10, 2020
378
43
Read further...if it is at a tournament it could just be some Neanderthal who likes riding umpires or had an issue with a particular umpire in an earlier game or a loudmouth who is commenting on any close call (or not so close) just to make a point.

Regardless, an umpire had better be 100% sure before forfeiting game, and if a coach says "I have no idea who that idiot is" then there goes 100% certainty. Otherwise, we are right back to the home team being responsible for crowd control. The main point is that crowd issues are not umpire issues and if umpires need to get involved it will not end well.
Umpire forfeiting the game better be prepaired to leave town to find future employment.
 

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