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Methods Taught for Hitting Drop/Rise Ball

Aug 21, 2008
76
0
This may have been discussed previously but I do not believe recently.

As my daughter ages, I would like to assist her in learning the best approach to hitting a drop and a rise ball (or other types of fastpitch pitches).

Some coaches teach to stand in the front of the box.

I am looking for some input.

Thanks.

kgertie
 
Aug 4, 2008
2,364
0
Lexington,Ohio
There are many good drills to learn how to hit rise balls and drop balls. Moving up in the box is not one of them and not a good idea.
Hands are always above the plane of the pitch and you adjust the bat angle to the pitch. Many are posted on here, but a good one is the two T drill. One T as low as it goes inside and in front of the plate by 5 inches. One outside and as high as it goes level to the middle of the plate. Call the pitch as the hitter loads and she must hit and adjust the bat to the called pitch. If she adjusts correctly she should be able to drive the ball up the middle on each called pitch. Soft Toss. Work the ball high to low, inside to outside and her have adjust to the pitch.
 

FJRGerry

Abby's Dad
Jan 23, 2009
202
0
Collegeville, PA
My understanding is both the drop & rise are thrown as junk pitches and shouldn't be crossing the plate in the strike zone, so I would think it's better to learn how to read these pitches and not swing at them. My 12U daughter throws the basic peel drop which looks like a low strike when the batter decides to swing but crosses the plate mid shin level when it's thrown perfectly. It's fun to watch batters strike out on this pitch - their faces usually read "what the...?"
 
Aug 21, 2008
76
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I do agree that many times these are thrown for junk and should not be swung at; however, there are some instances where a batter must try to make contact with the junk pitches, especially if the umpire is calling these pitches strikes.

With that said, any recommendations or links to video that can teach hitters how to recognize these "junk" pitches would also be appreciated. A weak high school program (which we have) may not have pitchers who throw much of these pitches and so when daughter faces other teams that do throw these pitches, she may be more apt to swing at the junk if she cannot learn to identify the various pitches / releases in order to chose to not swing. Thanks.
 
Jan 29, 2009
25
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I'm with SBFAMILY on this one. Both pitches rely on the hitter to lose their lead elbow and hands above the ball position in order to be successful. If a hitter does this on the rise, she'll never be able to get underneath the plane of the pitch and recover, and if they collapse the lead elbow and put the hands on a downward path, they won't be able to flatten out and get back on plane on the drop either.

The method? Be in a position at toe touch, where the brain can effectively communicate with the hands. If the hand path is in controlled and separation has occured, the brain will have an accurate read on where to send the hands next. The hitter has to feel where the hands "ACTUALLY ARE" at toe touch, so that communication is accurate. Most kids I've seen that don't stay above the ball, isn't becuase they don't want to, it's becuase they are unaware of their actual hand position at toe touch. Once we slow them down enough, or get some type of separation occuring, then the signal the brain sends is more accurate.
 
May 12, 2008
2,217
0
If a pitcher can't throw backspin or downspin/rise or drop, in the zone AND make most hitters I see in youth fp miss, they don't have a good rise or drop IMO. I believe there are both mechanical and training reasons for this. Long discussion I can launch if anyone is interested.

Assuming the pitcher can throw the rise or drop with good movement for a called strike how then does one train to hit them is the question. I'd start by seeing good ones if such a bp pitcher can be found. A two wheel machine can show you a good drop if not. If hitting them is a mystery I'd start by bunting them till that's easy. Then swing on them...a lot. If there are mechanics reasons they can't hit, then that's another subject I think. For the sake of this discussion, I'm assuming a hitter who can drive something without movement in any location in the zone.
 
Aug 4, 2008
2,364
0
Lexington,Ohio
Here is a drill we use to help see and adjust to different pitches and speed. It is called the Barry Bonds drill and I use it with my high school team. Start in the back of the batters box. Every time you hit the ball, take one step forward, till you strike out. I have kids now that can get to within 10 feet of the pitching machine. As you get closer the faster and higher the pitch. Then you back up doing the same drill. They love hitting of the machine now, because it has become a game. My local high school team set a team HR record last year and are now in the State record books. I give credit to this and other drills and the hard work they put in. .
 
Aug 21, 2008
76
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That is the dilemma. Our school faces other large schools that do have pitchers who use rise/drop balls and can put at least some of them in the stike zone. Our high school pitchers dont have those pitches. If I can find a two wheeled pitching machine to use, then, Mark, do you agree with Fastpitch Trainer and SBFamily that the key to hitting is adjustment of the bat angle? Thanks for the feedback.
 

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