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Incorrect Rule Interpretations - a running list

May 29, 2015
1,196
113
This was a follow the leader move. A signal is used to indicate the result of play. On a DTS, the batter-runner is neither safe nor out, but still in jeopardy pending action by the defense or lack of action by the offense
Agree with your logic about the batter being neither safe nor out making that mechanic awkward, but your statement isn’t entirely spot on ...

The safe signal in this case is the same as giving a safe signal on a dropped fly ball or as you watch a batted ball get close to a runner but not touch the runner ... it isn’t a ruling on the final outcome, but rather a signal that the ball is still in play. Some umpires would say it is your way of communicating “yes, I saw that”.

For what it is worth, I’m not a fan of the “safe” mechanic NCAA uses.
 
Apr 17, 2019
34
8
On a DTS the batter moves torward the dugout but does not enter it, then runs to first base and is safe. Parents in an uproar she should be out because she made a move to the dugout.

She is safe because she did not leave the field of play?
 

Tex

Sep 13, 2011
35
8
In all of my 25+ years of umpiring softball, and this includes ASA, USSSA, NFHS, etc., all of which I have umpired at the state and national level in each; keep in mind the most important rule in softball. "The parents, coaches, fans, etc. , no matter where they are standing, looking, or sitting, see the game better, know all the rules, and have more experience and training then the umpire!"
 
May 29, 2015
1,196
113
On a DTS the batter moves torward the dugout but does not enter it, then runs to first base and is safe. Parents in an uproar she should be out because she made a move to the dugout.

She is safe because she did not leave the field of play?
Correct most of the time ... most codes require the batter-runner to actually exit the field of play (“the team area”) before she is considered to have given herself up. Until then, she can change her mind (or, more accurately, realize what is happening) and run.

The only reason I say “most of the time” is because I am not familiar with every single rule set (and LL burned me on that ejection for stealing signs! 😃) . NFHS, USA, and USSSA are this way.

Personally, I would like codes to adopt the standard of leaving the area around home plate (define that however you like). I think it would naturally lead to batters being more aware of what is happening. But I don’t write the rules, I just call ‘em.
 
Mar 20, 2019
16
3
Wait! I've worked that field with that drunken field liner! But my favorite is when he redraws the batters boxes on an angle and they end up pointing 5-6 feet to the right of 2B.
Same here except it was the pitching rubber generally lined up so where between the plat and third base dugout.

Sent from my Moto Z3 Play using Tapatalk
 
Aug 1, 2019
161
28
South Carolina
3:42 That's Obstruction! lol that's the only thing I see wrong
I did hear that at the end, which I agree is completely wrong. Otherwise, Reynolds was spot-on.

The MLB rule is as follows:

(11) In running the last half of the distance from home base to
first base, while the ball is being fielded to first base, he
runs outside (to the right of ) the three-foot line, or inside
(to the left of ) the foul line, and in the umpire’s judgment
in so doing interferes with the fielder taking the throw at
first base, in which case the ball is dead; except that he
may run outside (to the right of ) the three-foot line or
inside (to the left of ) the foul line to avoid a fielder
attempting to field a batted ball;

Rule 5.09(a)(11) Comment: The lines marking the three-foot
lane are a part of that lane and a batter-runner is required to
have both feet within the three-foot lane or on the lines marking
the lane. The batter-runner is permitted to exit the three foot
lane by means of a step, stride, reach or slide in the immediate
vicinity of first base for the sole purpose of touching first
base.
What's not in the rule itself, but is covered by an official interpretation, is that should the batter-runner never run in the lane on his way to first base, he doesn't get the benefit of that "step, stride, reach or slide" that would put him in the exact position that Turner was in when he hindered Gurriel's ability to catch the throw. If Turner had been in the lane and then stepped out of it to touch first base, this would not have been a violation.
 

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