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If You Could Create the Perfect Coach...

May 5, 2008
358
0
If you could choose qualities of a coach to coach your child, what would they be?

What characteristics would you NOT want them to have?
 

KAT

May 13, 2008
92
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My ideal coach....

Driven, knowledgeable, passionate, productive, fair. Is a professor of the game or striving hard to be. Can set the bar high and challenge the girls, but knows how to dissect the action without attacking their character. (such as you need to do this with your feet, glove etc... not can't you get to that ball, you are being lazy, stupid etc. ) Fair, doesn't show favoritism even if he has favorites. Can motivate without humiliating. Keep the practice interesting and fast moving, productive. Keep the practice intense but fun. Discipline is a must but not taken to the personal level. I guess thats it....we have had the chance of working with several coaches like this and its a pleasure working with them. Unfortunately we have had alot in between. Actually DD worked with one last night....love him!!!
 
Jul 17, 2008
65
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in the dugout
great question stacie!!! as a coach, i'll be more than intersted in seeing what everyone believes to be good qualities... hopefully it is qualities that i can put into my program if we don't already have them.
 
May 5, 2008
358
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Personally, I like coaches who teach, not dictate. I like coaches who actually care about the girls and show it.

I also like coaches who have rules, lay them out BEFORE the season AND stick to them on a regular basis - not only when it's convenient for them.

I like coaches who are on time!!!!

I can't stand coaches who say one thing then do another...or tell you what you want to hear, then go off and carry out actions that complete oppose their own words.

It burns me up to see coaches who don't bother to show up at the field when they told the girls to be there, who's daughters are late along with others, and who PLAY the girls who don't bother to be on time and who only give their best effort they feel like it.
 
Coaches who are fair all the way around - not just with certain players. Coaches who show just as much interest in the number 1 player as they do the last one on the list. A coach who nails you when you have missed a play but sings your praises when you have given it your all. We are very fortunate to have 3 of the best coaches in the area at our school. It is easier to come up with the "non-qualities" from our summers of rec league ball!

A ranting coach seems to drive away players. One who, if they have had a bad day, they take it out on players. A coach who tells the player what to do instead of showing them. A coach who doesn't seem to have much interest in any other player but their own. A coach who doesn't listen to a player or give them the opportunity to play a certain position. A coach who moves around the infield when they have been there all season long - just causes mass confusion, especially during a game! A coach who can't see that the one player who has caused a loss should be replaced occassionally - every player can be pulled at some point, in my opinion, and should be to let them realize that they CAN be replaced at any given moment. A coach who does not follow the rules set by the league. Coaches who attempt to teach something they have no idea about in the first place and then ream the children when they fail to make the "cut".
 

FastpitchFan

Softball fan
Feb 28, 2008
496
0
Montreal, Canada
A bad coach....

- Doesn't walk his talk
- Expect things that he doesn't preach (i.e. tells players to eat well and he eats a fries)
- Closed-minded (not open to new ways of doing things)
- Believes he is right and his way is the only way (many hitting techniques works and not every pitching technique works for every body type)
- Believes too much in the "my way or the highway" philosophy
- Lacks interpersonal skills
- Isn't structured - players like structure
- Doesn't have a well-defined coaching philosophy
- Doesn't simplify complex skills when teaching them - too much details and jargon - doesn't keep things simple and progressive
- Runs a practice without prior planning or preparation
- Isn't in it for the kids or love of the game

I could keep going but this is a decent list.

Marc
 

halskinner

Banned
May 7, 2008
2,695
0
A bad coach....

- Doesn't walk his talk
- Expect things that he doesn't preach (i.e. tells players to eat well and he eats a fries)
- Closed-minded (not open to new ways of doing things)
- Believes he is right and his way is the only way (many hitting techniques works and not every pitching technique works for every body type)
- Believes too much in the "my way or the highway" philosophy
- Lacks interpersonal skills
- Isn't structured - players like structure
- Doesn't have a well-defined coaching philosophy
- Doesn't simplify complex skills when teaching them - too much details and jargon - doesn't keep things simple and progressive
- Runs a practice without prior planning or preparation
- Isn't in it for the kids or love of the game

I could keep going but this is a decent list.

Marc
Hi Marc. I'm going to add in a coach, especially of a very young team, needs to know how to bring his/her level of explaining things DOWN to his players level of understanding. He/ She should NOT expect them to bring their level of understanding up to his/her level of explaining.

I cannot count how many times I have seen coaches who were very knowledgable about the game (and had a lot to offer) fail badly because the players just didnt get what he/she was trying to explain.

It is most prevalent in male coaches of young girls teams. If that 50 year old big, hairy guy cannot come across like a 10 year old, he will have a hard time of it. If they know for sure that the coach is having just as much fun teaching as they are having fun learning, they will be back for more with big smiles on their faces.

I wish they would all remember "THEY AINT LITTLE ADULTS!".
 
May 5, 2008
358
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Great great info - Marc, you pointed out something I see a lot: coaches expecting something they've never covered (as "routine" as it may seem - if you haven't covered it, you don't get to "correct it")
 
R

RayR

Guest
I think the most important attribute a coach can possess is integrity.

Whatever he or she's coaching philosphy and background is, integrity is the glue that holds it all together.

Whether you believe winning is most important or child development or fun is, a great coach will communicate this to the players and parents and stay true to his/her word no matter how the season plays out.

A coach is a role model to the kids whether they like it or not. What better example can a coach set then to display unwavering integrity to his or her coaching ethics?

If you are a win at all costs type of coach that feels it neceesary to berate the players for mistakes, man up and say that at tryouts. Some people will embrace this, some will not but at least everyone knows what you are about.

The worst thing a coach can do is intentionally deceive the players and parents into believing the experience will be something that it will not be.

Ray
 
Dec 28, 2008
393
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The number 1 thing I share at coaching clinics is that coaches need to check their pride at the door. The game isn't about the coach, it is about the players. My belief is that 99% of the yelling/ranting/raving/chewing out stem mainly from the notion in their heads that "Sally Sue made ME look bad by making that error. People all over the world are now going to think that I'm a bad coach and didn't teach her better than that. So I better stand up for myself right now in the middle of this inning and let everyone know that I did by yelling it right at her."

So the first thing parents should look for in choosing a coach is HUMILITY.

Ray - I do like INTEGRITY too that is HUGE.

But lets face it ... coaches are not paid a single nickel on most teams to coach and the days of even taking applications is gone and instead leagues now have to beg anyone that they can to coach. So the dream team list put together probably isn't going to come along for every team. HOWEVER, I hope that parents realize that they can help their cause out alot by modeling the things that they hope to see in the coach. Encourage the coach after a tough loss - "Coach I really appreciate your working so hard the past 2 weeks in practice we could see that the girls were learning how to do deal with that situation and I know if you continue working with them that they will get it." Show up early even if you know that the coach will be late. Get the girls started with their jogging/stretching before they even get there if need be. Make it clear to the coach that the girls will be on time and are ready to play ball. Many times, believe it or not, coaches were on time for years and learned that parents would always be late so they started coming late to be "on time" with the parents. If you don't want a coach that is too focused on winning then don't let them hear rants and raves after close games. With a smile on your face let them know it sure was exciting to be involved in such a close game and you look forward to more close games in the future. Have a small celebration with cupcakes or something after the last practice before the season starts to let the coach know how much you valued all of the time they put into practices and that you look forward to the season. If you make it clear that you value the learning and not the winning it will be easier for them to focus on that now that the season has started.
 

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