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I guess it is my turn, my DD. Have at it so we can improve. 12 YO

Jul 29, 2013
257
28
So I pulled up a Josh Donaldson video as that is who I have used as a template and I see it. My and my DD's upper half gets a backward tilt toward the catcher. All of them maintain a pretty vertical spine on their move out. Any drills to work on moving out while keeping the upper body directly under the hips.
I've been following this post and here are some things to consider.
Rotate the bat around the spine for the most efficient transfer of energy.
If the swing (shoulder) plane matches the pitch plane then the axis (spine) must tilt rearward (toward the catcher).
In order to keep the spine tilted rearward the front leg will appear to reach forward from so it can touch the ground and the back leg needs to bend or else the front leg will stay elevated.
With a rear tilted swing plane, the plane is high in the front and low in the back. So it follows that as you rotate your shoulders inward, the front shoulder should drop as it follows along the plane and then rise as it moves forward along the swing path.
Opening the hips prior to the swing (shoulder turn) torques the core.
The outward turned rear foot (duck feet) creates the need for a greater rear hip outward turn to open the pelvis towards the pitcher inhibiting that core torque.
Your daughter stops her hip and shoulder rotation and extends early to the ball.
 
Jan 6, 2009
2,486
63
Chehalis, Wa
I've been following this post and here are some things to consider.
Rotate the bat around the spine for the most efficient transfer of energy.
If the swing (shoulder) plane matches the pitch plane then the axis (spine) must tilt rearward (toward the catcher).
In order to keep the spine tilted rearward the front leg will appear to reach forward from so it can touch the ground and the back leg needs to bend or else the front leg will stay elevated.
With a rear tilted swing plane, the plane is high in the front and low in the back. So it follows that as you rotate your shoulders inward, the front shoulder should drop as it follows along the plane and then rise as it moves forward along the swing path.
Opening the hips prior to the swing (shoulder turn) torques the core.
The outward turned rear foot (duck feet) creates the need for a greater rear hip outward turn to open the pelvis towards the pitcher inhibiting that core torque.
Your daughter stops her hip and shoulder rotation and extends early to the ball.
Bobby,

Joey Myers talks about the hips tilting or angling up as an action of hitting against the front leg. There's more to it and if I can find the info I'll get back to you. I do know he says the back knee lowering is like creating an angle for contact/flight. In golf the club head is angled and in hitting you create the angle.
 
Jul 29, 2013
257
28
Bobby,

Joey Myers talks about the hips tilting or angling up as an action of hitting against the front leg. There's more to it and if I can find the info I'll get back to you. I do know he says the back knee lowering is like creating an angle for contact/flight. In golf the club head is angled and in hitting you create the angle.
I like to teach getting the hips out front and keeping the head over the back thigh. Everybody talks about coiling into the back hip when, in reality, all that's happening is you're pushing your butt (center of gravity) in front of the legs (also known as falling forward) Then the front leg extends to keep you from falling on your face. So much for staying balanced in the swing.
If the forward move is really big, the front leg must get well in front and post up to keep the head and upper body from drifting forward during the turn.
It's just creating forward momentum against an offset stop (or better yet, a countering movement) to aid in rotation.
 
Oct 13, 2014
1,607
63
South Cali
I like to teach getting the hips out front and keeping the head over the back thigh. Everybody talks about coiling into the back hip when, in reality, all that's happening is you're pushing your butt (center of gravity) in front of the legs (also known as falling forward) Then the front leg extends to keep you from falling on your face. So much for staying balanced in the swing.
If the forward move is really big, the front leg must get well in front and post up to keep the head and upper body from drifting forward during the turn.
It's just creating forward momentum against an offset stop (or better yet, a countering movement) to aid in rotation.
Can you show me a good pro who positions this way Bobby?

Getting into a FYB position to hit from is hard. It’s not for everyone.
 

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