Welcome to Discuss Fastpitch

Your FREE Account is waiting to the Best Softball Community on the Web.

Register Log in

Hiding the Grip

sluggers

Super Moderator
Staff member
May 26, 2008
6,225
113
Dallas, Texas
Yes, if she uses the same grip for multiple pitches then why worry about it. Or, if the grip change is too subtle to be detected. If I can't pick the pitch when I'm catching for her, and I make it a point to look, then I don't see a reason to be concerned.
You probably aren't very good at picking pitches.

Let's assume you want your DD to play in college...here is the deal:

Your DD will play a pre-conference schedule made up of a variety of teams, and then the conference schedule. Then, whoever wins the conference tournament gets to go the NCAA tournament.

The HC gets a bonus for winning the regular season conference, the conference tournament, etc. So, there is real money at stake.

Suppose your DD is the #1 pitcher at Ohio U (just for grins). Guess what? She will pitch against every team in the conference twice during the regular season. Then, she will have to pitch against those teams again in the conference tournament.

So, during the games, there are usually at least three coaches plus two pitchers and a catcher watching every pitch your DD makes. They are trying to find a way to pick her pitches.

Assuming your DD gets to "the big game" in the conference tournament, the opposing coach will call her pals in the conference asking if they have any info on your DD.

So, your DD's motion gets dissected. If there is any way to pick a pitch, they will find it.

...

I told the story a few weeks ago...but, two years ago I helped my DD pick pitches from a HS pitcher. We didn't pick her grip, she did something in her pre-motion that gave away her pitch.
 
Aug 21, 2008
1,210
113
Yes, if she uses the same grip for multiple pitches then why worry about it. Or, if the grip change is too subtle to be detected. If I can't pick the pitch when I'm catching for her, and I make it a point to look, then I don't see a reason to be concerned.
Fair enough.
 
Aug 21, 2008
1,210
113
You probably aren't very good at picking pitches.

Let's assume you want your DD to play in college...here is the deal:

Your DD will play a pre-conference schedule made up of a variety of teams, and then the conference schedule. Then, whoever wins the conference tournament gets to go the NCAA tournament.

The HC gets a bonus for winning the regular season conference, the conference tournament, etc. So, there is real money at stake.

Suppose your DD is the #1 pitcher at Ohio U (just for grins). Guess what? She will pitch against every team in the conference twice during the regular season. Then, she will have to pitch against those teams again in the conference tournament.

So, during the games, there are usually at least three coaches plus two pitchers and a catcher watching every pitch your DD makes. They are trying to find a way to pick her pitches.

Assuming your DD gets to "the big game" in the conference tournament, the opposing coach will call her pals in the conference asking if they have any info on your DD.

So, your DD's motion gets dissected. If there is any way to pick a pitch, they will find it.

...

I told the story a few weeks ago...but, two years ago I helped my DD pick pitches from a HS pitcher. We didn't pick her grip, she did something in her pre-motion that gave away her pitch.
2 points of order here Sluggers:

First, while they are learning more and more from NFCA conventions and hiring good assistants, I don't know how many HC's are good at picking pitchers. Most of the time, the AC's and other players on the opposition are "charting" pitches... sometimes looking for patterns and sometimes just so a hitter can see what they were pitched for their next at bat. EVERY team does this charting thing, and I'm unsure of my position on it. In my experience, the player who's doing the charting needs to be very observant and know what they're looking for or else high pitches are mistaken as riseballs, ones in the dirt for drops, outside for curves, etc. etc.

Second, the NCAA prohibits teams from getting scouting info on teams from the same conference. So, Alabama is not allowed to contact LSU for the scouting report on Georgia. Alabama can contact Florida State for their scouting reports, their pitching charts and anything else they'd want to share but you cannot do that in conference. And if Florida State asked Alabama for info on Georgia, 'Bama is not allowed to give it since Georgia is in their own conference. I am assuming this is true in all divisions (D1, 2, and 3). Of course, it still happens on the downlow. But nothing official can transpire for an inconference opponent. But playing someone out of conference is open season. Although many schools choose not to give out their scouting reports or trade them. Most of the time, coaches trade them like bubble gum cards. "we'll give you our scout on Florida if you give us yours on 'Bama" for example. But again, you're at the mercy of whether or not that person doing the charting really knows what pitch is thrown. Personally, I didn't pay a lot of attention to them because there's too many variables. The 3 main things I'd look at is, if they swing at the first pitch, if they are a slapper, and if they pull the ball most of the time. I didn't look at the reports of "Sally Jones struggled with the riseball".

Bill
 
May 15, 2008
713
43
Cape Cod Mass.
You probably aren't very good at picking pitches.

Let's assume you want your DD to play in college...here is the deal:

Your DD will play a pre-conference schedule made up of a variety of teams, and then the conference schedule. Then, whoever wins the conference tournament gets to go the NCAA tournament.

The HC gets a bonus for winning the regular season conference, the conference tournament, etc. So, there is real money at stake.

Suppose your DD is the #1 pitcher at Ohio U (just for grins). Guess what? She will pitch against every team in the conference twice during the regular season. Then, she will have to pitch against those teams again in the conference tournament.

So, during the games, there are usually at least three coaches plus two pitchers and a catcher watching every pitch your DD makes. They are trying to find a way to pick her pitches.

Assuming your DD gets to "the big game" in the conference tournament, the opposing coach will call her pals in the conference asking if they have any info on your DD.

So, your DD's motion gets dissected. If there is any way to pick a pitch, they will find it.

...

I told the story a few weeks ago...but, two years ago I helped my DD pick pitches from a HS pitcher. We didn't pick her grip, she did something in her pre-motion that gave away her pitch.
Tipping pitches is a concern for me but it's pretty far down on the list for most of the girls I work with. The more accomplished a pitcher becomes the more attention tipping pitches gets.
 
Aug 21, 2008
1,210
113
Tipping pitches is a concern for me but it's pretty far down on the list for most of the girls I work with. The more accomplished a pitcher becomes the more attention tipping pitches gets.
This is true. But sometimes when someone learns they tip their pitches, the changes necessary to fix it can be big. Even if they are actually small changes that need to be made, they can effect the psyche of a pitcher where they change other things that don't need 'fixing'. I prefer to teach basic concealment stuff as they learn the different pitches, not separately and years later. I do it together, but that's just me.
 

Latest posts

Forum statistics

Threads
35,888
Messages
537,574
Members
16,750
Latest member
Malik3169
Top