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Front Side Resistance

Apr 12, 2015
413
18
There is some slight glove swim, but there is also debate about how big a problem glove swim itself is.

Glove swim is more of a symptom rather than an independent problem. The main cause is incomplete or asymetrical adduction most often from a lack of core stability or strength.

The biggest problem in talking about FSR is the focus on the plant leg because this is the easiest to spot. A lot of coaches will say the front side resistance is good because the plant leg looks good and address the glove swim as if it were a separate problem. Instead all that needs be done is recognize that FSR starts with the plant foot and leg, but does not end there. Simply follow the kinetic chain from the plant foot through the body and into the ball and make sure the body stabilizes before energy passes through (leg, hips, shoulders, throwing elbow) and "problems" like glove swim will disappear without ever being directly addressed.
 

shaker1

Softball Junkie
Dec 4, 2014
894
0
On a bucket
Looking for good gifs to hopefully get some conversation going on FSR. For us it's been a tough teach. Understanding how to firm up so the knee doesn't take the blunt of the force has been a goal.
 
Apr 7, 2014
11
1
From watching video of my daughter this seems to be a huge issue hampering her timing and IR. Are there any drills that will help with this. I saw someone refer to push back drills, what are those?
Thanks in advance for the help.
 
Feb 3, 2010
5,142
38
Pac NW
On this site, push backs usually refer to a drill that primarily works on the initial portion of drive, but there is a “drill” or cue I like that I call step backs and may be referred to by some as push backs. At plant, there is a feel for standing tall, getting stacked and pulling in with everything at release, holding the pose briefly, then stepping back. I’ll try to shoot a short clip this weekend to demo what I’m talking about.
 
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Oct 4, 2016
148
18
Bump for this short clip :)

On this site, push backs usually refer to a drill that primarily works on the initial portion of drive, but there is a “drill” or cue I like that I call step backs and may be referred to by some as push backs. At plant, there is a feel for standing tall, getting stacked and pulling in with everything at release, holding the pose briefly, the stepping back. I’ll try to shoot a short clip this weekend to demo what I’m talking about.
 
Feb 3, 2010
5,142
38
Pac NW
For kids who tend to bend at the hips, here's one of several cues to help teach posture. At release, stay tall, hold the posture briefly, then step back. This is an exaggeration to build awareness. (I hate recording myself because I always find things to nitpick AND I look like doofball...)


Another cue that the kids like is to imagine a string or rubberband going from the nose to the toes and try to stretch it at release. More cues:

-Backchaining to the point of perfection, then increase effort while maintaining good posture
-Sgueeze the knees
-Drag the toenails
-“Think about” the foot pointing straight forward at plant.

The most simple cue is immediate feedback with alternating questions about what the pitcher thought: good, or not good. Teaching self awareness is the key.

I stole the string cue from FFS...
 
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shaker1

Softball Junkie
Dec 4, 2014
894
0
On a bucket
On this site, push backs usually refer to a drill that primarily works on the initial portion of drive, but there is a “drill” or cue I like that I call step backs and may be referred to by some as push backs. At plant, there is a feel for standing tall, getting stacked and pulling in with everything at release, holding the pose briefly, then stepping back. I’ll try to shoot a short clip this weekend to demo what I’m talking about.
Ken, I'd like your thoughts, and anyone else's, on trying to work more up than back at landing. As I watch some of the pitchers in the recent WCWS, I see kids who seem to work more forward with their weight, up to the point of being right on top of that front leg at release. Just a momentary pause during the whip phase of the pitch. Lowary, Elish, King, Plain are some examples. Fico is another who seems to transfer the weight "up" the chain rather than "back". Your cue of standing tall is a good one I think, because it makes one think of working up against the landing, which I believe helps create overlap if timed right, for the last chance to add whip to the ball. Next time your at a practice, try pushing up and through vs pushing back at landing, see what you think. Its an area where DD has found some recent progress in both speed and posture at release.


 
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