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Drop thrid question

Jun 22, 2008
3,253
48
Because by definition the going 3' out of the basepath is determined by the runners position and the base they are trying to get to, and a batter runner walking toward a dugout is not attempting to reach any base nor are they attempting to avoid a tag. And for that matter, no, the catcher does not have to chase after the batter runner, all they have to do is throw the ball to first base. You will not find any case play or clarification to support calling them out for being outside the basepath.

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Last edited:
May 29, 2015
372
43
It’s not a three foot radius from the tag ... the base path (base line, grr) is from the runner to the base. Until the runner breaks for first, there is no base path to deviate from.

Edit: Comp types faster.
 

MTR

Jun 22, 2008
3,368
48
why not! they are avoiding an attempted tag. Catcher does not have to keep chasing the BR all the way off the field while other runners may try to advance. If BR is not heading to 1st base and catcher going after her, how is that any different than a runner going fomr 1st to 2nd and avoiding a tag by going more than 3 feet out of the path to avoid the tag?
What do you propose, that the catcher just hold out the ball and if the runner doesn't break toward 1B, she should be ruled out?
 
Oct 11, 2018
38
8
Obviously all the experts came down with a perspective opposite mine so I'll stand corrected but I still have questions/comments.

In USA Base Path is defined as: Base Path: A line directly between the base and the runner’s position at the time a defensive player is attempting to tag that runner . In section 8 a different presentation says "When running to any base" so that complicates it. The actual definition did not require the runner going to that base.

The argument about the catcher does not have to chase and could just throw to the base could be said of any situation where a runner leaves the base path.

If the runner was going from 1st to 2nd and the defender held out the ball to tag (without chasing) and the runner went outside the path, would you call that a base path violation.?
 
May 29, 2015
372
43
I’ve been railing on about sloppy writing in rule books lately (IMO), and that may be another example.

So I get what you are saying. Nonetheless, if the runner is not moving towards a base I don’t interpret her as having a base path. That theoretical base path you propose would be consistently changing as she moved away.
 
Jun 6, 2016
874
28
Chicago
If the runner was going from 1st to 2nd and the defender held out the ball to tag (without chasing) and the runner went outside the path, would you call that a base path violation.?
The difference here, I think, is that the runner in the dropped third situation isn't "going from home to first." Not until she realizes her mistake and actually starts to advance.

If you're on first and going to second, I'm not really sure where else a runner would go if there was no play being made (chasing). Right field? It's one of those situations that's hard to find a direct comparison for.

I guess where it gets interesting for me is this: Batter strikes out, starts walking toward the third base dugout. Before she gets there, she realizes her mistake, so she turns around to begin running to first. If she runs in a straight line, her base path would take her through the infield, right? I think that would be legal, but it certainly seems like a play that would cause confusion.
 

MTR

Jun 22, 2008
3,368
48
This is not a difficult rule to understand. For that matter, it is so simple, I'm cannot figure out how it can possibly be misinterpreted.
 

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