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College World Series?

sluggers

Super Moderator
Staff member
May 26, 2008
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Dallas, Texas
A certain amount of hyperbole is to be expected in sports...

On the off chance that you may actually be asking a question, the College World Series is the NCAA championship. To participate in the CWS, the college supporting the team would have to be a member of the NCAA. It is my understanding that no other country in the world has sports teams officially affiliated and supported by universities.
 
Aug 21, 2008
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While I suspect this was a 'tongue in cheek' type question, I can tell you that through the joys of traveling I've experienced many people around the world laugh and joke at the Super Bowl champs being called "World Champs" or Phila Phillies being "world champs" when no other nations compete. It's a very good argument to make that the "World Series" name should be changed now that we have the World Baseball Classic. And we have since found out USA does not have the best baseball team on the planet! That said, the women's college world series name is for marketing. Yes, there are some international players but, it sure looks fancier on a souvenir tshirt when it says "world series".

Sluggers, I've been told that some of the better Canadian universities are applying and trying to become NAIA and NCAA schools. When/if this happens, it will be interesting to see how many US schools are able to get the better athletes (and coaches) from Canada.
 
Aug 21, 2008
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While i'm on the subject of WCWS... here's a question: I wonder if it's ever occurred to a D1 coach to go get a male pitcher from New Zealand or Australia (where males play fastpitch instead of baseball in schools). If females are allowed to play football, why can't males play fastpitch? The entire argument for "BackSoftball" is that baseball/softball are 2 different games. And we all know softball is not offered to boys on campuses. So what would've stopped me from playing college softball when I finished high school (other than my bad grades, poor SAT results, and lack of desire for more school?) I never actually went to college, instead began pitching year round between USA-New Zealand during opposite seasons. So... I guess I have 4 years of eligibility. Hmmmm
 

MTR

Jun 22, 2008
3,324
38
So what would've stopped me from playing college softball when I finished high school
Because softball is designated as a women's sport. The NCAA designates all sports M or W with the exception of three, fencing, skiing and rifle, where the is co-ed competition allowed along with M and/or W.
 
Aug 21, 2008
848
28
Because softball is designated as a women's sport. The NCAA designates all sports M or W with the exception of three, fencing, skiing and rifle, where the is co-ed competition allowed along with M and/or W.
Not calling you a liar but, you seem to forget about the woman who played kicker for Colorado's football team. Football is not offered for women so they had to let her try out. There was a big controversay about it all when she was eventually thrown off the team. She filed lawsuits, etc. Do a Google on it.
 
Aug 21, 2008
848
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That's funny. Although, a FREE college education? Sorry, at $30-50K per year, I'd swallow some pride for that. And, I'd probably be a feature on the Jim Rome show, how much more could I ask? LOL
 

MTR

Jun 22, 2008
3,324
38
Not calling you a liar but, you seem to forget about the woman who played kicker for Colorado's football team. Football is not offered for women so they had to let her try out. There was a big controversay about it all when she was eventually thrown off the team. She filed lawsuits, etc. Do a Google on it.
Well, I don't know if that have to let her get involved as much as avoiding the PC police. If a school HAD to allow a member of any gender try out for any team, you would see every member of a discontinued men's program trying out for equitable women's sports. Golf, bowling and track come to mind.

In reality, what would happen would probably be the same that occured in the late '80s in SE PA. Using a Title IX argument, a boy was allowed to play on a girl's HS field lacrosse team. I think the school thought that once he was required to wear the uniform (skirt), he would back out. He didn't, but the opposing schools would show up for a game and just refuse to put a team on the field as long as there was a male on the team. The only thing that happened is that his HS team didn't get much game time since most teams just walked away. If memory serves me correctly, the PIAA did not hold the forfeited games against those teams which refused to play.

IOW, allowing such participation would be counterproductive and ensuing legal action could very well kill a program.
 

sluggers

Super Moderator
Staff member
May 26, 2008
5,841
63
Dallas, Texas
Title IX requires that a school provide equal opportunities for each gender based upon the desire of that gender to participate in sports. There is no requirement that men and women have equal access to the sports.

So, if a school has 100 spots in sports for men to play, then they have to have 100 spots for women to play in sports. If men start playing on women's teams, then the school has to create more places for women to play.

We can get into a whole discussion about this--but, basically, the schools say sports exist on campus to develop leadership and teamwork skills. These are skills women also need to develop. Therefore, the opportunities for each to participate in sports must be equal.
 

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