Blocking using one arm/hand

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May 24, 2013
12,364
113
So Cal
Up till now, she has only used the primary receiving position and falls forward to block. We are working to change that.

Even in the primary/ low receiving position, the throwing arm shouldn't be behind her back. It's unnecessary. My preference is to see the hand tucked down next to the ankle.

In addition to the other issues brought up in other comments, 1 arm behind the back during blocking makes it much harder for her to get her shoulders square to the path of the ball. Angled shoulders/chest results in blocked balls being deflected sideways instead of staying in front.
 
Last edited:
Oct 19, 2017
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Even in the primary/ low receiving position, the throwing arm shouldn't be behind her back. It's unnecessary. My preference is to see the hand tucked down next to the ankle.

In addition to the other issues brought 1 arm behind the back during blocking makes it much harder for her to get her shoulders square to the path of the ball. Angled shoulders/chest results in blocked balls being deflected sideways instead of staying in front.

Thanks, this is what I’ve taught my DD and she does well. She has other issues we are trying to overcome (like blocking can be scary thing to her…) but her overall technique is quite good thanks to the NECC and Xan’s DVD.
 
May 24, 2013
12,364
113
So Cal
Thanks, this is what I’ve taught my DD and she does well. She has other issues we are trying to overcome (like blocking can be scary thing to her…) but her overall technique is quite good thanks to the NECC and Xan’s DVD.

Your DD is still young, and it's fairly common for 10yos to struggle with blocking. Keep working at it, and it will come.
 

RADcatcher

Possibilities & Opportunities!
Dec 13, 2019
5,836
113
California
87.6% of all statistics are made up on the spot. :)

That being said, throughout the careers of each of my catchers, chest, stomach, and forearm bruises were about equally spread at various levels of play. Early on, inexperienced pitchers were all over the place which translated to blocking all over the place. As experience increased, so too did velocity, which reduces response time in the catcher. The majority of the issues were not called curve balls in the dirt, but rather spiked fast balls that bounce erratically in the "goat pasture" quality ball fields that are common here in the mid-west. We taught our catchers that once you make the decision to block, the mitt rolls over, the throwing hand goes behind the mitt, elbows against the side of the body (for joint protection), all creating a single barrier to stop and deaden the ball. Ideally, the catcher is centered up. But once the ball hits the dirt....see goat pasture reference above.
( why are your catchers getting bruises on their chest and stomach if they're wearing a chest protector?)

Phew... I'm so glad to know there are mechanics to use that alleviate most of those bruises for catchers.

Catchers getting many bruises is because some catchers are taught to just squish their body down and get hit by all dirt pitches. Thats blocking with body as the only philosophy to stop a dirt pitch.
(unnecessarily)

There are mechanics that alleviate getting bruises, and control the ball at the same time.
Thankfully they are taught and used!

GO GLOVEWORK!
 
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RADcatcher

Possibilities & Opportunities!
Dec 13, 2019
5,836
113
California
The ole one arm behind the back catching....... yeah can we just stop this already.
Isn't it amazing?! some people are still suggesting to put the catcher at such a bad disadvantage trying to have to do a very athletic thing.
( not jabbing the OP of the post, know they were just bringing up a question)


Compare this to how people train the defense.
Does anybody train the defense to take grounders with their throwing hand behind their back? Hope not.
 
Last edited:
Apr 20, 2018
3,129
113
SoCal
Old school baseball coaching/teachings never seem to die. Somebody remembers how they were taught 57 years ago (in baseball) and attempts to apply it in softball today. It is pretty obvious that catching in baseball is different than catching in softball. Angles matter.
 

RADcatcher

Possibilities & Opportunities!
Dec 13, 2019
5,836
113
California
Old school baseball coaching/teachings never seem to die. Somebody remembers how they were taught 57 years ago (in baseball) and attempts to apply it in softball today. It is pretty obvious that catching in baseball is different than catching in softball. Angles matter.
Not certain that has to do with now vs. then
rather more of a 'monkey see monkey do' scenario
Rather than
monkey see and think about it first befor just doing...
(...please)
 

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