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Bat drag

fanboi22

on the journey
Nov 9, 2015
826
43
SE Wisconsin
The instant your biceps disconnect, your torso, and therefore the bat head begins to slow. Watch what happens when this guy extends his arms.

The difference in speed in this example for a quarter turn is .400 sec for tight, and .800 sec for extended - double the speed. A baseball swing is roughly a quarter torso turn, but of course it uses strength and leverage and forward/stride momentum, so the time in seconds is not the same but the effect is similar.
So, just so i am clear, you are stating that the bicep closer to the torso is the faster movement in the video example you posted? I would think it's the opposite. As Quasi states, the bicep close to the chest creates arm bar hence the arm is extended farther and the barrel is farther out. I do agree with Bobby S somewhat on this though, that the barrel itself will be faster the farther out it is as long as the forces remain and the torso turns at the same speed. I think of the huge blades on the wind powered turbines and how ridiculously fast the ends of those things are moving.

As far as the optimal element you talk about, i agree. I am just trying to decipher if i want my DD's front arm pinned to her torso or not. I didn't think i did.

Another thing to mention, unless it starts pinned, then there must be some bend in the front elbow already, unless they are already barred. If not barred, then any lengthening and straightening of the arm has to be a leak of power in the swing.

i thought that a bent arm staying bent thru helps eliminate the leak. At least thru the start of the swing until the arms are extended and the barrel is released to whip. IMO
 

fanboi22

on the journey
Nov 9, 2015
826
43
SE Wisconsin
@efastball I just looked up a Bellinger HR, he does start with the bicep seemingly against the the chest, and as long as the front elbow is pointing more down, i can feel that it doesn't need to be an arm bar start. Soooooo, i think i agree. Just not certain that Ron Sullivan is forcing the bicep away. I do see the bicep move away from the torso at contact. the person you shows with the highest exit velo seemed to be barred at contact. So maybe i am just missing the bicep/torso with a bend and only extends at contact. I will have to work on this.

edit: as a note though, i dont think i have ever heard to keep the bicep against torso. Creates leverage for sure, i assume this helps connection.
 
Jun 8, 2016
7,688
113
The instant your biceps disconnect, your torso, and therefore the bat head begins to slow. Watch what happens when this guy extends his arms.

The difference in speed in this example for a quarter turn is .400 sec for tight, and .800 sec for extended - double the speed. A baseball swing is roughly a quarter torso turn, but of course it uses strength and leverage and forward/stride momentum, so the time in seconds is not the same but the effect is similar.
I am not saying you are right or wrong but using conservation of angular momentum as the only principle at work here is simplistic. Are you positive that the forces created by the muscles are equal or better the closer the arms are to the body?
 
Nov 30, 2018
338
43
Marikina, Philippines
The instant your biceps disconnect, your torso, and therefore the bat head begins to slow. Watch what happens when this guy extends his arms.

The difference in speed in this example for a quarter turn is .400 sec for tight, and .800 sec for extended - double the speed. A baseball swing is roughly a quarter torso turn, but of course it uses strength and leverage and forward/stride momentum, so the time in seconds is not the same but the effect is similar.
You are using individual arms, just like the ice-skater. Use them both simultaneously holding an object, as in hitting, and things change. I understand this principle. It is elementary. This demo is the same as the spot spin in ice-skating, or as you say, conservation of angular momentum.

I would just rehash arguments I made before about arm-bar, extended left forearm issues, adjustments to the inside pitch, "arm-bar" is reactionary adjustment to perception, movement and distance, etc. Problems with inside "heat".

I would suggest you never try to hit by holding the bat in one hand and extending the arm to hit. In essence the front biceps is keeping you from doing just that, by restricting that extension with the front arm. The back arm can only extend the forearm to reach out to hit that outside pitch, for whatever reason, instead of hitting it properly "where it is pitched".
 

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fanboi22

on the journey
Nov 9, 2015
826
43
SE Wisconsin
Also, i would ask, isn't arm bar a form of casting? Isn't casting bad?

Also would add, i don't think you can pronate the front arm without pulling it away from the torso.

My current thoughts are to leverage the torso at launch perhaps but then turn the barrel into the path which separates the bicep from torso and then extend to release. But during the initial part of swing to turn the barrel as you stay connected to the shoulders not allowing the elbow to get ahead, then extend to the ball wherever it is.
 
Jan 28, 2017
1,057
63
May have been mentioned but years ago we talked about the front armpit being compressed. I feel this helps you stay connected until you release the hands and elbows. Thoughts
 

fanboi22

on the journey
Nov 9, 2015
826
43
SE Wisconsin
May have been mentioned but years ago we talked about the front armpit being compressed. I feel this helps you stay connected until you release the hands and elbows. Thoughts
I thought i remember a video that FFS posted with a tennis ball drill, where someone took the front arm with a tennis ball and pronated the front forearm while extending and throwing the ball forward. It seems like to keep the pit compressed, there is a greater tilt shift of the shoulders which isn't necessarily a bad thing, just never thought of it that way. I have done the towel under the arm pit for golf, maybe this is a good drill for hitting? At a certain point it really isn't a compressed pit, but the bicep pinned to the pectoral. Not sure how that may not be an issue for a girl/woman where the pec area is not all muscle.
 
Jan 28, 2017
1,057
63
IMO. If you compress the armpit until the hands and elbows go the bicep will look like its across the pectoral. If the armpit stays compressed and you get a scap load you will not bar much if any.
 

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