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Backyard vs. Game

May 9, 2008
45
0
How do you get your pitcher to pitch at the same level in a game that she does in the back yard? My DD goes all out in the yard practicing when she pitches to me. She is actually the number 1 catcher, she is the #2 or 3 pitcer, but when she pitches, she doesn't have an experienced catcher. She sometimes says she's afraid to hurt her friend who stepped up to catch so she could pitch, or she doesn't trust her to stop a wild pitch. We keep telling her she can't think about all of that she's just got to throw hard. So far I haven't seen it. Any advice???
 
May 7, 2008
110
0
CJ,

This is going to be redundant...get a book by Dr. Bob Rotella called "The 15th Club". It's a golf book, but it deals directly with this common problem of being great in practice and then struggling in games.

Keith
 

sluggers

Super Moderator
Staff member
May 26, 2008
5,898
83
Dallas, Texas
Why does your DD want to do? Does she want to be a catcher or a pitcher? How old is she? Is she very social? Is she friends with everyone on the team? Does everyone like her?

To be honest, it sounds like DD is a catcher and not a pitcher. Your DD is showing empathy. Pitchers generally have little if any empathy, while catchers have lots of it.

A pitcher is the center of the universe in a softball game. Her only concern is throwing the ball. She doesn't have a lot of concern or interest in the other players on the field--whether they are offensive or defensive. The better a pitcher becomes, the less she does other than throw the ball. She doesn't bat, and she is taught to avoid fielding. While it sounds wonderful, the fact is that a pitcher spends a lot of time watching the game and not playing the game.

A catcher, on the other hand, is the only person on defense that sees the entire field. She is concerned about the position of every player and the "health and well-being" of every player, and, most importantly, the pitcher. She is much more involved in the game than the pitcher (believe it or not).

I don't think every girl in the world has the psychological makeup to be a pitcher. I don't think every girl in the world can be a catcher.

JRW
 

Amy in AZ.

Super Moderator
May 7, 2008
8,507
48
Tucson
I would develop the catcher. If they are friends, have her catch the backyard practices.

Do some catching drills with the friend to make her feel more comfortable. Have her encourage your DD, during the game. "It's you and me Jelly! Shoot to me! Throoooooow that ball!"

There is a poster here from New England that runs catching camps. He has a DVD.
 

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May 9, 2008
45
0
Thanks for the advice. She is a catcher at heart, and truthfully this will probably be the last year that she pitches. She learned to pitch originally just because at the time there was only one other one her age who could throw strikes. She LOVES to catch, she starts HS next year and she doesn't think she will pitch after this year.
 
Jun 3, 2008
1
0
genola utah
i think that it is good that you have the catcher that catches for her come and catch for her in the back yard so that way it builds great trust between the two.
 

sluggers

Super Moderator
Staff member
May 26, 2008
5,898
83
Dallas, Texas
ChebJudy: A true story: My oldest daughter was a great pitcher. My youngest daughter was more talented, but hated to pitch. BUT, all the HS coach could think was "that young one will win me a championship". The HS coach put so much pressure on her to pitch that she quit softball, although she was an excellent hitter and fielder.

So, what I'm saying is "leave the kid alone". She is telling you, indirectly and politely, that she wants no part of pitching. Do her and yourself a favor and tell the coach to find another number 2 pitcher.

JRW
 

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