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A youth sport story--I can't make this stuff up.

sluggers

Super Moderator
Staff member
May 26, 2008
6,396
113
Dallas, Texas
I'll refer to the school as Ivy League School. The school was either Harvard, Yale or Princeton.

Mother played a sport at Ivy League School She wanted her DD to play for Ivy League School. For whatever reason...athletic talent, grades, eye color...the kid wasn't offered a position on the team.

The mother said, and I quote, "I'm going to tell everyone about the way the coach treated my DD! No one will ever want to play for Ivy League School again!"

(FYI: You aren't qualified to be a success until someone told you, "You aren't good enough.")
 
Jun 8, 2016
7,690
113
I'll refer to the school as Ivy League School. The school was either Harvard, Yale or Princeton.

Mother played a sport at Ivy League School She wanted her DD to play for Ivy League School. For whatever reason...athletic talent, grades, eye color...the kid wasn't offered a position on the team. (FYI: You can't be successful until someone has told you, "you aren't good enough".)

The mother said, and I quote, "I'm going to tell everyone about the way the coach treated my DD! No one will ever want to play for Ivy League School again!"
15 years ago (e.g. a year before I started teaching at OU) this sort of comment would have surprised me...not anymore.
 

RADcatcher

Possibilities & Opportunities!
Dec 13, 2019
2,320
113
California
At Long Beach State one year during what was the open tryout session.
A walk up was warming up throwing.
Guess what happened?!
The girl missed the throw comming at her....head high.
Yep...she missed it! The ball tipped her glove a pegged her in the head...seam mark and a lump. That ended her day trying out.
She was told thank you for attending...but no return visit extended.
The next day the mom called HC to complain she didnt get a fair chance at tryouts.
The HC had to then explain playing catch is the first test in trying out.
 
Last edited:
Jun 8, 2016
7,690
113
At Long Beach State one year during what was the open tryout seesion.
A walk up was warming up throwing with one of our outfilders.
The girl missed the throw comming at her....head high.
Yep...she missed it and the ball tipped her glive a pegged her in the head...seam mark and a lump. That ended her day trying out.
She was told thank you for attending...but no return visit extended.
The next day the mom called HC to complain she didnt get a fair chance at tryouts.
The HC had to then explain playing catch is the first test in trying out.
So you are saying this sort of stuff happened 60 years ago too? ;)
 
Apr 28, 2014
1,849
113
We were having the conversation last night (me and DW). I have a theory that almost everyone overrates their own kid. We try our best to underrate our kid. I think when you underrate your DD you are in essence pushing her to be better. I tell DD that all I want from her is her very best. Sometimes she faces teams that are just better than her, I don't mind those losses, they build a pitcher. What I do mind is when she is not giving her best. The most important role of a parent is to really know the level of your DD. Take off the rose colored glasses and see it. I'll never forget the day we walked into a tryout 4 years ago at our current org. We thought DD was a stud. Then we saw her current teammate (sec commit) throwing a practice session. We looked at each other and said "DD is never gonna pitch at Florida" LOL. Many people lack perspective, we did until that day. Not anymore.
 
Apr 23, 2014
315
28
East Jabib
We were having the conversation last night (me and DW). I have a theory that almost everyone overrates their own kid. We try our best to underrate our kid. I think when you underrate your DD you are in essence pushing her to be better. I tell DD that all I want from her is her very best. Sometimes she faces teams that are just better than her, I don't mind those losses, they build a pitcher. What I do mind is when she is not giving her best. The most important role of a parent is to really know the level of your DD. Take off the rose colored glasses and see it. I'll never forget the day we walked into a tryout 4 years ago at our current org. We thought DD was a stud. Then we saw her current teammate (sec commit) throwing a practice session. We looked at each other and said "DD is never gonna pitch at Florida" LOL. Many people lack perspective, we did until that day. Not anymore.
In your (our) neck of the woods almost everyone thinks their kid/team is better than they actually are. When your kid/team starts to play out of state and I’m not meaning the state next door, I’m talking down south or out west, you start to see that good teams are made up of 9 tough outs not 3 and that the pitching is at another level. DD made the switch to play for a nationally ranked team in the south and has held her own against tough competition. She had to switch her mentality from being a strikeout pitcher to a pitcher trying to keep the ball in the park real quick.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Josh Greer

DFP Vendor
Jul 31, 2013
765
43
Central Missouri
We were having the conversation last night (me and DW). I have a theory that almost everyone overrates their own kid. ....
[SARCASM] In this era where "Reality TV" is the dominate media but is the farthest thing in existence from reality, social media allows everyone their own broadcast network/publisher to live life out loud (but generally not honestly), and we are all winners and losing isn't my fault because I have an excuse. So how do we overrate our own?[/SARCASM]
 
May 6, 2015
1,680
113
We were having the conversation last night (me and DW). I have a theory that almost everyone overrates their own kid. We try our best to underrate our kid. I think when you underrate your DD you are in essence pushing her to be better. I tell DD that all I want from her is her very best. Sometimes she faces teams that are just better than her, I don't mind those losses, they build a pitcher. What I do mind is when she is not giving her best. The most important role of a parent is to really know the level of your DD. Take off the rose colored glasses and see it. I'll never forget the day we walked into a tryout 4 years ago at our current org. We thought DD was a stud. Then we saw her current teammate (sec commit) throwing a practice session. We looked at each other and said "DD is never gonna pitch at Florida" LOL. Many people lack perspective, we did until that day. Not anymore.
DW always says I judge DD much more harshly than other players. she is probably right. but again, it is not because we do not think they are good players, but we want them to be the best they can be, and only by improving on needed areas can this happen.
 

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