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Thread: Drill to keep front shoulder open

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    Checking out the clubhouse cjrenick's Avatar
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    Chris, thanks for the response. What is this drill that you mention? " One could be push-to-plant with only up to slingshot arm movements."

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    Member Chris Delorit's Avatar
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    Absolutely.

    Sure, that means just simplifying the drive motion to a point where you're focusing primarily on the lower half mechanics and sequencing. So, from push off the rubber into the frontside plant and what that weight shift will provide for the trailing backside (or previous push foot). You may choose to introduce a simplified/simulated motion (slingshot) if it helps to feel the changes in posture. She's not interested in actually releasing a ball, but just to place her mind within the process in order to feel the mechanical changes that she's working on. A simplified dry run.

    To get her started, use a new "template". Use rubberized tape if your inside or spray paint if your outside. Identify targets to include pitching rubber, a linear pitching lane, plant position and follow-through path for her trailing foot. Obviously, video will allow her to see how she is performing compared to target examples.

    Chris

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    I eat, sleep and breathe softball coach james's Avatar
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    There are 4 points of resistance.
    She is missing 3 of those.
    1. Front leg (check)
    2. hip stabilization (miss)
    3. torso stabilization (miss)
    4. upper, inner arm stabilization into the ribs/ aka brush (miss)
    "The only difference between average and exceptional, is the attention to detail applied to the task... Don't practice mistakes." James Clark

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    Checking out the clubhouse Psyco Si's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Delorit View Post
    Absolutely.

    Sure, that means just simplifying the drive motion to a point where you're focusing primarily on the lower half mechanics and sequencing. So, from push off the rubber into the frontside plant and what that weight shift will provide for the trailing backside (or previous push foot). You may choose to introduce a simplified/simulated motion (slingshot) if it helps to feel the changes in posture. She's not interested in actually releasing a ball, but just to place her mind within the process in order to feel the mechanical changes that she's working on. A simplified dry run.

    To get her started, use a new "template". Use rubberized tape if your inside or spray paint if your outside. Identify targets to include pitching rubber, a linear pitching lane, plant position and follow-through path for her trailing foot. Obviously, video will allow her to see how she is performing compared to target examples.

    Chris
    This sounds similar to what Iím doing with my DD. Iím curious what the ďfollow through path for her trailing foot.Ē Should be? Iíve seen so much variation and Iím not sure what the best path would be?


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    Member Chris Delorit's Avatar
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    Psyco,

    Suggest a path as close to linear relative to her power line as possible. The cadence of releasing of the backside trail is equally as important to the sequencing process as is the push and plant. Ideally, her trail foot toe will drag as lightly as possible where her shoe laces are oriented toward her catcher. A smaller degree of deviation into an elongated figure-S or fish hook-ish path should be just fine. What you're looking to try to avoid is excessive east/west deviation in your north/south power line, where she may begin to introduce other mechanical inefficiencies through the chain. If you get to the point where you see The Sign Formerly Known As Prince, you're beyond reproach!

    Basically, the pitching cadence is really just open to closed and back to open again. In the lower body footwork, there's push, plant & trail. As the back hip rotates from closed to open (near release point), the back leg has to rotate and travel with it. Because we have "hinges", the rear knee will naturally collapse and follow the rear hip open. The trail foot follows similarly into it's follow-through release. The trail foot drag and drag path also helps with backside stability and overall posture.

    When you see deep diagonal east/west rudder ruts, those are usually exaggerated, non-natural escape routes from players who very likely never achieve final rotation of their rear hip, knee and foot back to open position.

    You and your daughter can often get alot of feedback about the trail foot directly from the playing surface. If your in a gym, look for alot of shoe rubber and/or listen for loud squeeking from the trail foot. If your in dirt, it's as easy as looking for that deep rut. These are easy ways to help determine if your daughter is also wasting energy by dragging the kitchen sink through wet concrete.

    Chris
    Last edited by Chris Delorit; 11-22-2018 at 05:38 AM.

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    Softball Junkie shaker1's Avatar
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    Good advice so far. Her hand looks great throughout the pitch, no pushing. Work on dragging that back toe. Posture is a issue, stay upright, arm closer to the body, no hinge at waist. Keep after it, she's doing good

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    Certified softball maniac lhowser's Avatar
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    This would be one of my favorite explanations to deal with some of the issues you describe. (and from a very trusted source)


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