Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3
Results 21 to 25 of 25

Thread: Back Elbow

  1. #21
    Certified softball maniac FP26's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,610
    Thanks
    1,889
    Thanked 1,919 Times in 1,141 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by julray View Post
    I know now that this is not relative to what the OP is asking about, however, how do you pinch/load your scap without your elbow traveling ever so slightly behind your back?

    Attachment 13508
    If you draw a line from the front shoulder through the rear shoulder to the rear elbow, are you sure both hitters have their elbow behind their shoulder line? What about the hitters below?


    "Once you stop learning, you start dying" -- Albert Einstein.

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to FP26 For This Useful Post:

    FiveFrameSwing (12-05-2018)

  3. #22
    Certified softball maniac RichK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,243
    Thanks
    329
    Thanked 587 Times in 359 Posts

    Default

    Elbow 'direction' is a result of handset, grip and turn-the-barrel mechanics. Without seeing it hard to understand exactly what she is doing but her 'problem' isn't where the elbow points but needs those other elements cleaned up. Start with the cause not the effect.

  4. #23
    Softball Junkie julray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    892
    Thanks
    113
    Thanked 147 Times in 109 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FP26 View Post
    If you draw a line from the front shoulder through the rear shoulder to the rear elbow, are you sure both hitters have their elbow behind their shoulder line? What about the hitters below?


    Shoulder/upperback does go with the elbow a little when loading/pinching the scap. I mean when loading the scap you are using your back muscles, but the elbow does travel behind your back a little... that's what I feel. Sit on chair with back against the upright portion, now load your scap. Depending on the width of the upright portion of the chair your tricep should hit the edge and your elbow will be slightly behind your back. In the pics I posted you can clearly see this. The fault I see in some hitters is they overcook it, my DD does this sometimes.

    2018-12-05 9-53-56 AM.jpg

  5. #24
    Softball Junkie julray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    892
    Thanks
    113
    Thanked 147 Times in 109 Posts

    Default

    Here are some more examples

    2018-12-06 8-44-54 AM.jpg

  6. #25
    Certified softball maniac FP26's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,610
    Thanks
    1,889
    Thanked 1,919 Times in 1,141 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by julray View Post
    Shoulder/upperback does go with the elbow a little when loading/pinching the scap. I mean when loading the scap you are using your back muscles, but the elbow does travel behind your back a little... that's what I feel. Sit on chair with back against the upright portion, now load your scap. Depending on the width of the upright portion of the chair your tricep should hit the edge and your elbow will be slightly behind your back. In the pics I posted you can clearly see this. The fault I see in some hitters is they overcook it, my DD does this sometimes.

    2018-12-05 9-53-56 AM.jpg
    I realize that "scap pinch / scap load" are popular phrases today, but it isn't really something I focus on. If a hitter develops a good sequence, these things will essentially take care of themselves. As you said, there is a tendency to overcook it. I do believe that the muscles in the scap area are engaged during the move out, but there are different degrees as can be seen by the various examples we both have posted. So it isn't that there isn't a scap type action involved in this process, just that it is sometimes more of a focus than it needs to be. JMHO.

    NOTE: Instead of the chair demo, try standing with your back against a wall. Make sure both shoulders are touching the wall, or as close as you can get based on your range of motion. Hold a bat in a typical position. Now pinch/load your scap as you typically would. As your rear elbow goes back, what happens to your front shoulder?
    "Once you stop learning, you start dying" -- Albert Einstein.

  7. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to FP26 For This Useful Post:

    FiveFrameSwing (12-06-2018), Work=wins (12-06-2018)

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •