Talk to Other Fastpitch Softball Fanatics ... for FREE!

Register today and get the uncensored, and yes, the sometimes uncomfortable truth from real softball fanatics who live and die on the softball fields.
Signup to Discuss FastPitch Forum
Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 49

Thread: Reality has sunk in for DD1

  1. #31
    Certified softball maniac obbay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    2,188
    Thanks
    2,025
    Thanked 662 Times in 345 Posts

    Default

    Lauren Haeger didn't start pitching until she was 13. She was a catcher.

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to obbay For This Useful Post:

    55dad (02-13-2018)

  3. #32
    Certified softball maniac canyonjoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    1,869
    Thanks
    205
    Thanked 1,000 Times in 581 Posts

    Default

    We had a girl on our 12U team who moved away when she turned 13. She was a pretty good player but started toying around pitching. She will graduate this year and is going to pitch at a D1 school next year. I know others who played rec until they were 13 and now are likely to get some good looks over the next few years. The National team is a whole different story.

  4. #33
    Certified softball maniac YOCOACH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Right Here For Now
    Posts
    2,732
    Thanks
    1,772
    Thanked 2,091 Times in 1,063 Posts

    Default

    I can't tell you how many players have developed over the years at the age of 13 to the top collegiate levels. There are several reasons for this. For some, it was because they were late bloomers. For others, it was because they finally found knowledgeable, worthy coaches to teach them the proper fundamentals and push them. For even more, it was because they had the drive to succeed no matter what. Any combination of the above will usually get her to play at the collegiate level. A combination of all 3 with the proper exposure/familial marketing has the possibility of getting your DD her ultimate dream. It's never too late IMO. However, she needs to work her tail off to reach for the golden star...or at least the USA Olympic SB team.

    ETA: Just look at Adam Rippon. 18 years of skating with numerous setbacks and on the third try he finally made the Men's Olympic skating team only to lay out an almost perfect session at the age of 28 which is old by most figure skating standards; not to mention so many more Olympic athlet's at the "older" athletic ages not only perservered, but won medals in their particular chosen sports.
    Last edited by YOCOACH; 02-12-2018 at 08:41 PM.
    Win the games you're supposed to, win some of the games you're not and make the rest of the teams know they've been in a battle to beat you.

  5. #34
    Softball Junkie CoachJD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    629
    Thanks
    495
    Thanked 442 Times in 219 Posts

    Default

    I really encourage you to watch some D1 games that aren't on ESPN in June. Your daughter may never be good enough for Oklahoma (or she might!). But there's a whole wide world of D1 that ain't OU.

    I think there were 295 D1 softball schools last year. That's a lot of schools! Try to find a MEAC or SWAC game (no offense to anybody who has a DD who plays in those conferences!). I think you'll see a pretty big difference between what you see with the SEC/Pac-12 schools and what you see with those. And, of course, there are some excellent schools on the lower end of D1 softball competition.

    Verbose way of saying: Your daughter might be better than you think, and not all D1 is created equal.

  6. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to CoachJD For This Useful Post:

    gamommax3 (02-13-2018), let it be fun (02-13-2018), MNDad (02-13-2018)

  7. #35
    I can talk softball all day BB875's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    385
    Thanks
    330
    Thanked 115 Times in 59 Posts

    Default

    Bob - if your daughter is the best player on her team (and she is determined to become a better ball player), you need to find a new team. Find one where she isn't the top player. That will push her in a direction she can see immediately. I really don't like the "A/B/C" labels on teams. Its so arbitrary & many coaches sandbag to bring home hardware. Find a very competitive team & give your DD an option to step up. Her teammates will be players with the same goals. Good luck!

  8. #36
    Softball Junkie #7sDad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    580
    Thanks
    708
    Thanked 683 Times in 258 Posts

    Default

    Also, another question to ask is "why D1?" If she has good grades she's likely to get more money at D3 based on academics and merit than sports money at a D1. There are some tremendous D3 teams and a lot more D3 schools than D1. They also "usually" carry smaller rosters. So while they play fewer games, she may see more time on the field.
    Donít practice until you get it right. Practice until you canít get it wrong.

  9. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to #7sDad For This Useful Post:

    BB875 (02-13-2018), CoachJD (02-13-2018), YOCOACH (02-13-2018)

  10. #37
    I can talk softball all day let it be fun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    244
    Thanks
    185
    Thanked 223 Times in 128 Posts

    Default

    A lot can happen between 13 and 18. I have seen several 14B and 14C girls play college ball. One went to a top 25 D1 team. She was a late-bloomer who was batting 9th and playing RF in 12U. I know another player who was basically benched until she quit her 12U team and she is now a D1 pitcher. However, as others have said, D1 is not always all that it is cracked up to be. Softball becomes a job at that level. If you love the competition, can balance tha academics, and you LOVE softball it is perfect for you. If not, D3 can be a great way to be a student/athlete and get a little more of the typical college student experience.

  11. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to let it be fun For This Useful Post:

    55dad (02-13-2018), Eric F (02-13-2018), YOCOACH (02-13-2018)

  12. #38
    Always learning... Eric F's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    8,410
    Thanks
    5,301
    Thanked 6,397 Times in 3,299 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pattar View Post
    We hit off the tee and I front toss wiffles (behind a bownet) in our garage. We have a 3 car garage but it could be done in a 2 car garage. You just have to be willing to withstand the constant banging of the wiffles against the garage door We also do some ground ball work as well. Only thing a person can do is work as hard as they to achieve their goals. If you do that, whatever the outcome, you will not have any regrets later in life.

    Edit: Just saw your post about no basement/garage. Have her take dry swings somewhere in the house. When I was growing up in MA, we didn't have a basement and we had a 1 car garage with no room. When I wasn't playing hoop, I would take a 100 swings with a weighted bat and another 100 with my game bat. Not sure it did any good but at least I felt like I was doing something and confidence in your abilities is half the battle sometimes....
    On rainy days, I front toss my DD Anywhere Balls in our living room for hitting work. The ABs wont break windows or TVs...and sting a lot less than wiffles. She will do bare-hand receiving work with the ABs, too.
    A TB parent's life...Drive. Write checks. Eat tacos.

  13. #39
    Certified softball maniac YOCOACH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Right Here For Now
    Posts
    2,732
    Thanks
    1,772
    Thanked 2,091 Times in 1,063 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by let it be fun View Post
    A lot can happen between 13 and 18. I have seen several 14B and 14C girls play college ball. One went to a top 25 D1 team. She was a late-bloomer who was batting 9th and playing RF in 12U. I know another player who was basically benched until she quit her 12U team and she is now a D1 pitcher. However, as others have said, D1 is not always all that it is cracked up to be. Softball becomes a job at that level. If you love the competition, can balance tha academics, and you LOVE softball it is perfect for you. If not, D3 can be a great way to be a student/athlete and get a little more of the typical college student experience.
    And there are many D2's that are the same way as long as you look for them and promote/market properly.
    Win the games you're supposed to, win some of the games you're not and make the rest of the teams know they've been in a battle to beat you.

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to YOCOACH For This Useful Post:

    55dad (02-17-2018)

  15. #40
    Checking out the clubhouse ksusouthpaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    26
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 22 Times in 12 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BB875 View Post
    Bob - if your daughter is the best player on her team (and she is determined to become a better ball player), you need to find a new team. Find one where she isn't the top player. That will push her in a direction she can see immediately. I really don't like the "A/B/C" labels on teams. Its so arbitrary & many coaches sandbag to bring home hardware. Find a very competitive team & give your DD an option to step up. Her teammates will be players with the same goals. Good luck!
    You said this better than I did above. You donít have to be in an A team, but if she wants to play college, she needs to play in A level tournaments. Is it impossible to get to college not playing in these tourneys? Yes. But much more difficult.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Segment -- Burn -- Conversion --