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Thread: Good vids that breakdown throwdown mechanics?

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    Softball Junkie justanotherguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DRDRODD View Post
    OK, I have to ask this question and it is one of the biggest problems I have with my DD and I am not sure on what to do about it. What are you all teaching/taught/teach about recognizing a would be base steal'er? I find that a lot of catchers do not notice when a runner is attempting a steal and causes them to be late throwing the ball. This is one area that I find baseball catchers have a huge advantage over softball catchers. Baseball can have a running start so to speak (like the video JAG talked about in his earlier post) since the runner can leave whenever they want, the catcher can see the runner break first so they already know before the pitcher even releases the ball that they are throwing. I know that in an ideal world teammates/coaches/fans would yell out something but I find a lot of the time this just isn't the case. Are lets say it is during a very noisy game and the catcher can't hear. Does anyone have anything that they teach regarding this? May be a way to use their vision differently are subtle cues to look for? I just see a lot catcher's sticking a pitch with her eyes focused on the glove/ball and the runner is well into the steal. This is one thing that working on the transfer time cannot help with. A girl can have a .5 second transfer time but if she doesn't recognize the steal early she has not shot at getting her out.
    I think this is something that only experience can teach. I don't think it's ever been an issue with my DD as she seems to have a good "IQ" and rarely gets caught napping. That being said, I can tell when a girl is going to steal a good 3 out of 4 times just based on her body language and how she sets up on the base. If she's INTENTLY watching the pitcher's movements, and you see her swinging her arms in time with the pitcher, you know something is up.


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    Quote Originally Posted by DRDRODD View Post
    OK, I have to ask this question and it is one of the biggest problems I have with my DD and I am not sure on what to do about it. What are you all teaching/taught/teach about recognizing a would be base steal'er? I find that a lot of catchers do not notice when a runner is attempting a steal and causes them to be late throwing the ball. This is one area that I find baseball catchers have a huge advantage over softball catchers. Baseball can have a running start so to speak (like the video JAG talked about in his earlier post) since the runner can leave whenever they want, the catcher can see the runner break first so they already know before the pitcher even releases the ball that they are throwing. I know that in an ideal world teammates/coaches/fans would yell out something but I find a lot of the time this just isn't the case. Are lets say it is during a very noisy game and the catcher can't hear. Does anyone have anything that they teach regarding this? May be a way to use their vision differently are subtle cues to look for? I just see a lot catcher's sticking a pitch with her eyes focused on the glove/ball and the runner is well into the steal. This is one thing that working on the transfer time cannot help with. A girl can have a .5 second transfer time but if she doesn't recognize the steal early she has not shot at getting her out.
    Peripheral vision will only help so much, and the catcher's primary concern is receiving the ball cleanly. If teammates and/or coaches aren't vocal and audible when a runner is going, they're not mentally in the game. That's the time DD needs to hone an overlooked skill set - being a field general!

    For some kids, my DD included, it can take some time for a catcher to assert herself and be comfortable doing so. I have to say one of the proudest moments I've had watching DD play was a couple months ago at a showcase where a kid stole 2nd on her with nobody yelling "going." She called timeout, huddled up the infield AND outfield in the circle, and went off on all of them to get their heads in the game because college coaches were watching. Her teammates may not have liked that message, but they damn well respected it, because they've been vocal ever since!

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    Softball Junkie justanotherguy's Avatar
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    Been working on this in the garage this winter. We hit the field today to see what things look like with some real throws. Still got issues but the transfer part seems to be getting better. https://youtu.be/vsb92WLRMoo

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    Always learning... Eric F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by justanotherguy View Post
    Been working on this in the garage this winter. We hit the field today to see what things look like with some real throws. Still got issues but the transfer part seems to be getting better. https://youtu.be/vsb92WLRMoo
    Her transfer movements are fine (in this situation). Her feet are the hold-up. Speed up the dance. Right now, her feet have a tempo - step.....step. Speed up the music - stepstep.

    Don't forget, she still has to keep strikes looking like strikes. In the video clip, she's standing up when she catches the ball. Do the work to simulate game conditions as close as possible. This also includes dealing with batters getting in the way of where your body wants to go, and pitches in locations that aren't the best for efficient throws.
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    I agree with Eric's assessment. I would suggest that she takes her normal game situation receiving stance. From the video she would be standing up blocking the umpires view. Focus on POP. Meaning pop up and turn her body in one movement if possible...if that makes sense. The fewer steps and body movements the faster the ball will get to 2nd base. I have seen catchers with weak arms but fast feet and fast transition get our more base stealers than kids with cannons.

    at 35 seconds is what I am trying to convey.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lOkGosoTKNs

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    When looking at a catcher's throws, try to identify what is controlling the speed of their movement - hands or feet...or both. I find that most of the time, it's feet. Speed up the feet, and the hands will (usually) speed up to get their job done on time. Less often, it's the hands, but a long and loopy hand path can be an issue that causes time. As Orange Socks said, a quick release will often get the ball to the base sooner than just a strong arm.
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    justanotherguy -

    This might be helpful to show your DD since they are similar in age. Have her pay attention to the quickness/tempo of Maddie's feet.


    In looking for things to improve in this ^^^ clip, the throwing hand path could have a little less of a loop, and her right foot comes around to the left a bit too far. These are detail tweaks that could shave some additional fractions of a second off her release time.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric F View Post
    justanotherguy -

    This might be helpful to show your DD since they are similar in age. Have her pay attention to the quickness/tempo of Maddie's feet.


    In looking for things to improve in this ^^^ clip, the throwing hand path could have a little less of a loop, and her right foot comes around to the left a bit too far. These are detail tweaks that could shave some additional fractions of a second off her release time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Orange Socks View Post
    I agree with Eric's assessment. I would suggest that she takes her normal game situation receiving stance. From the video she would be standing up blocking the umpires view. Focus on POP. Meaning pop up and turn her body in one movement if possible...if that makes sense. The fewer steps and body movements the faster the ball will get to 2nd base. I have seen catchers with weak arms but fast feet and fast transition get our more base stealers than kids with cannons.

    at 35 seconds is what I am trying to convey.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lOkGosoTKNs
    Staying low is the most important info in this video. A catcher can take two tenths off by not standing up to throw.

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    I can talk softball all day Gags's Avatar
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    JAG,

    Can I suggest losing the crossover step? Think of it as an IF throw - right to left, left to target ("tap your feet together" is a cue I'll sometimes use with 10U's) [Note - glad I re-read before posting - "left to right" only works if you're a lefty!]. Shortening up the distance the feet travel may quicken them by default. She'd still gain ground (just not as much), and she'd still have fwd momentum during her throw.

    Eric - was Maddie in a secondary stance for the above clip? It looked lower like a primary stance. I know the secondary stance is much rarer in softball than in baseball - and I think Schroeder teaches to throw from a primary stance. Wasn't sure which school of thought Maddie uses for this particular mechanic.


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