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Thread: What part of the feet have to be on the rubber?

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    Certified softball maniac Lozza's Avatar
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    Default What part of the feet have to be on the rubber?

    I've been told the same thing by two different blues in the past two days. Personally I find it nonsense, and can't find any reference to it in the rules (ISF) but am happy to admit I'm wrong.

    I stand with a wide stance, with my left foot on the furthest edge of the left side of the pitching rubber. If it's a raised rubber, my left foot will have the toe in contact with the plate, and the heel of my right foot with also be in contact. If it's a flat rubber, my left toe will be over the rubber, and the very back of my heel will be on the right side.

    Both umpires told me this weekend, that my left foot must be inside the peg. (the peg that holds the rubber down) I clarified with both umpires that my foot was touching the plate and they both confirmed it was.

    Is my stance illegal?

    (to make it clear as mud, I'm putting up a picture showing my stance. Marvel at my awesome Paint skills! Black is obviously the rubber, red is my feet, and the yellow is where the pegs would be.


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    Certified softball maniac Comp's Avatar
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    Here is the ISF rule,

    RULE 6. PITCHING REGULATIONS (Fast Pitch Only).
    N.B. The EFFECT for all Sections 1 - 7 follows at end of Section 7:
    Sec. 1. PRELIMINARIES.
    Before commencing the delivery (pitch), the pitcher
    a. May not take the pitching position on or near the pitcher's plate without having the ball in his possession.
    b. Shall not be considered in the pitching position unless the catcher is in position to receive the pitch.
    c. Must have both feet on the ground within the 61.0cm (24 in) length of the pitcher's plate. The hips shall be in line with first and third bases and both feet must be in contact with the pitcher's plate.
    d. Must, while standing on the plate and with the ball in either the glove or the pitching hand, take the signal, or appear to be taking a signal, from the catcher with the hands separated.
    e. Must, after taking the signal, bring his whole body to a full and complete stop with the ball held in the hand or glove with both held together in front of the body. This position must be held for not less than two (2) seconds and not more than five (5) seconds before releasing the ball. NOTE: Holding the ball in both hands to the side of the body is considered in front of the body.

    Says nothing about any pins in the pitching plate. Only says the feet must be within the 24" width of the plate.

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    KCM
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    How about the standing on the plate portion of the rule? My daughter likes for her left toe to touch edge and her right heel to touch edge, never actually being on top of the rubber. Kind of like the picture above. So not actually on the plate.

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    Certified softball maniac Comp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KCM View Post
    How about the standing on the plate portion of the rule? My daughter likes for her left toe to touch edge and her right heel to touch edge, never actually being on top of the rubber. Kind of like the picture above. So not actually on the plate.
    That would depend on the rule set. ASA allows the pivot foot to just have the heel touching the front edge of the pitching plate. FED, USSSA and I believe NCAA require at least a portion of the pivot foot to be on top of the pitching plate while the stride foot may just be in contact with it.

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    Certified softball maniac quincy's Avatar
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    That is how Hillhouse suggests a P does it in his videos, basically get as much separation of the feet as the rules allow.

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    13th Step Softball Addict coach james's Avatar
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    The "peg rule" is a new one for me.... most of the pitchers plates around here are step style, buried... no pegs at all. As far as I knew. It all boils down to both feet being in contact with the rubber, there is no distinction as to what part of the foot or where the foot is placed on the rubber.

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    JAD
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    I am not an expert on the rules, but I always thought that as long as both feet are in contact with the rubber when you start your wind up, you are good.

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    JAD
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    BTW - if both feet have to be inside the 'pegs', why don't they just shorten the rubber?

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    MTR
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    Quote Originally Posted by coach james View Post
    The "peg rule" is a new one for me.... most of the pitchers plates around here are step style, buried... no pegs at all. As far as I knew. It all boils down to both feet being in contact with the rubber, there is no distinction as to what part of the foot or where the foot is placed on the rubber.
    In ASA, NFHS, ISF, NCAA and possibly others, the feet must be within the 24" length of the PITCHER'S PLATE. IOW, they cannot be off the ends as in SP. There is no such thing as being "between the pegs" as it pertains to the rules. I can only surmise this was a method someone was using as a reference to give umpires an idea of how to apply the rule. However, I'm with the others. The better plates will not show where the "pegs" are located if there are any, at all.

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    Certified softball maniac Lozza's Avatar
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    I play on a grass field and he diamonds are packed up at the end of the days play. So the plates have to be pegged down. Why the permanent ones are pegged I don't know.

    Thank you for confirming I've read the rule right. Ill have my joe lol next time I see the head umpire (one of the umpires who told me this)

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