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Thread: Ice Sleeve for pitchers?

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    Certified softball maniac obbay's Avatar
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    Default Ice Sleeve for pitchers?

    Has anyone heard of this or know where I can get one? Several years ago a PC told me that when she played, she had one of these she could keep in the freezer and use after practice and games. DD ices shoulder, but I think her elbow would benefit from ice too.

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    Certified softball maniac guero_gordo's Avatar
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    Saw this in-store at Dick's yesterday. Looks well made. Not sure about using it for a "brace", but it should hold the gel tightly to the joint.
    Shock Doctor Ice/Heat Shoulder Wrap Brace - Dick's Sporting Goods
    "All facts are friendly" --Carl Rogers

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    Banned halskinner's Avatar
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    Please remember, the use of ice is for a therapy treatment for injuries.

    When it comes to pitchers, if you ice, YOU ARE DONE FOR THE DAY. To pitch mopre after icing you are risking serious injury.

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    Softball Junkie SoCal_Dad's Avatar
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    We had the Pro Ice Shoulder / Elbow wrap and I wouldn't recommend it. The gel packs aren't cold enough and they're very difficult to keep frozen at the fields.

    We like the products that use ice - EZ Ice, Total Ice and Pro Series are all basically the same company. It's a lot easier to get ice from a cooler or snack bar. You also have a lot of control over the pack's coldness by varying the mixture of ice and water.

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    Checking out the clubhouse Cat5's Avatar
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    DD pitching coach suggested using a cold shoulder wrap to prevent injury (as well as treat injury).

    We actually like the pro ice one because the ice packs are so flexable. We keep them in a good cooler with ice and they are still frozen at the end of a day. They dont last as long as bigger ice packs, but last for about 20 mins which is long enough to start the job. We also bought some replacement gel packs which we keep in the freezer at home for re-icing once we get there.

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    Banned halskinner's Avatar
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    The medical experts recommend

    20 mins on
    20 min off
    20 mins on
    20 mins off
    20 mins on and thats it. This is to speed up the blood flow to the are for the body to repair itself. More tham that will slow down blood flow and slow the process down.

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    Softball Junkie joemcq51's Avatar
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    I agree with Hal on using ice only when done for the day if necessary. Do not try and ice the shoulder, than warm up again later in the day. Recipe for disaster

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    Certified softball maniac obbay's Avatar
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    Thanks for the responses!
    Yes- We only ice when done for the day.

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    Softball Junkie Indiana's Avatar
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    ^^^^ Yep; just when done for the day. I use the very low-tech plastic wrap and ziploc bag. An ice sleeve of some sort would probably be more environmentally friendly but in a pinch plastic wrap does the job well.

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    Certified softball maniac Rocketech1's Avatar
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    I would spend a little time educating yourself on whether or not icing is necessary or even harmful to the bodies natural recovery process:

    Icing Your Pitching Arm
    By Steven Ellis, former Chicago Cubs pitching pro

    I am sure almost all of you have iced your arms after pitching at one point in your career. You may have been told to do this by a coach, trainer, teammate, etc.

    It is a common belief that icing a pitcher’s arm after an outing will help prevent injuries and speed up the recovery time.

    However, this is not entirely true. Icing may in fact inhibit the recovery process.

    When ice is applied to a tired shoulder, the blood flow is slowed, and the delivery of nutrients to the shoulder area is hindered. After a pitcher throws, the shoulder is in need of repair.

    Like any muscle in the body, the shoulder muscles break down when used and must be rebuilt before they can be used at full potential again.

    The body uses blood to transport nutrients to the worn out muscles so they can be rebuilt. If ice is applied to the shoulder, these nutrients take longer to reach the shoulder and stall the healing process.

    You may be asking yourself why you see the professional pitchers icing their shoulders after a game.

    One reason is that ice is good when there is shoulder pain. Pain is different than fatigue. If there is pain, there is a good chance there is inflammation, and the ice will reduce this swelling. It is smart to ice the shoulder only when there is pain after throwing.

    A good example to put this into perspective is to treat the shoulder as any other muscle in the body. After you do bicep curls, do you normally ice your biceps? Of course not! Are your biceps sore after a work out?

    Most likely, yes they are. But there is a difference between soreness and pain. The key is being able to know what you are feeling.

    So what is a good alternative to icing?

    When your arm is tired after throwing, one of the best things you can do is run. I personally will run several foul poles immediately after I pitch, and then I will run a few miles on the treadmill the day after.

    This helps circulate the blood throughout the body and through the shoulder, delivering the much needed nutrients to where they are needed the most.

    The next time you finish pitching, don’t necessarily grab the ice bag. Do some light running the day of and the following day, and see if you feel any better.

    Icing your arm will inhibit the body’s natural healing process, and will slow down your recovery time.

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